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Where are those rules listed? I don't think I saw them prior to praising our fellow member.

Thanks,

LoveMyMini
This thread was started just by a random member, not by the site owners or by a moderator. no rules here, but owning just a high mileage vehicle is nothing to be proud of.

Driving a lot of miles is a different story.

Buying a ex-delivery (or taxi) vehicle is usually nothing to be proud of either, driving one of those is a different story.

Nothing wrong with buying or owning a high mileage vehicle, if that vehicle has been properly maintained.

I would not congratulate anyone for owning a high mileage vehicle which miles were drove by somebody else. Maybe for owning a high mileage vehicle keept in very nice condition.
 

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You are wrong. We are talking about having the most miles on our cars. Not second hand, not low mile purchases, nothing, just how many miles are on your car, period. You are adding way too much to this. It's only miles, nothing more.
 

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My family always, always, always got rid of a car nearing 100,000 miles. We never kept it for more than 80,000. My ex husband's family, any car nearing 50,000, it was time to go out and get a new car. My dad worked on our cars too. So, coming from that background, you can't fault me for thinking this way.
Then, why you keep that problematic vehicle? 🤔

Think you are in the wrong forum, most of us here own high mileage vehicles.
 

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2005 Dodge Grand Caravan C/V
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Where are those rules listed? I don't think I saw them prior to praising our fellow member.

Thanks,

LoveMyMini
They aren't listed anywhere because they don't exist.

Levy bosses people around, tries to intimidate them, and makes up his own rules that he thinks people should follow as he goes.

Just ignore him.
 

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In my vans case, I do know it's history. In the first 4 years it was used in S.C. as an auto parts chain warehouse to store delivery vehicle, where it acquired 220K miles on it. To average almost 200 miles a day, they must have not shut it off much during the days. LOL My nephew bought it (along with another '07 that had 330K miles on it LOL) and we brought it to Southern Mi. for my sister to use for her estate sale business. She used it for 8 years and put another 93K miles on it. I bought it in Dec '19 and I have put 17K miles on it, which has gotten it to the 329K+ that it has now. I would not hesitate to hop in it tomorrow and take it on a 500 mile trip. And it's "twin" that my nephew bought at the same time with 330K miles on it in 4 years - it got retired with collision damage back in '16 with 395K miles on the clock. I almost bought it back in '11 when my sister bought this one, but one of his co-workers snagged it up before I could go get it.

So while I am not the original owner and don't claim to have put all the miles on this van, I do know it's history, especially the last 110K miles. Right now I have 3 Dodge vehicles in my driveway - a 99 Dakota V6 with 255K miles, a 96 5.9 Ram 1500 with 205K miles, and the '07 van with almost 330K miles. Lets just say high mileage on vehicles don't scare me very much.
 

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I'm über impressed, Willie. Since I don't work on vehicles, I am leery of cars with a lot of miles on them. This minivan is the first in my family to have reached the 90,000 mile mark and I've gone over the 111,000 mile mark now. I told my mother and she said, "Wowwwww." My dad is a retired mechanic and I said we've never had a car go over 80,000. My dad was not a car mechanic by trade, he was a heavy maintenance mechanic in the military, but he worked on our cars and on friend's cars. His friends and my friends would ask him to work on their cars as favors because he was good with domestic cars. I'm doing a little more repairs if I think I can. I ask here and look at a video and decide if I can tackle it. I live in an apartment and do not have the resources at my disposal at the moment to work on my car(s), so I'm limited with what I can do. I hope to get where Willie1 is with my minivan, but I doubt if I can go that far with my girl. I do have high hopes. She is trying so hard, though. The collision I had in 2018 was a doozy and the heat and super cold weather and the open air garage has been hard on the girl. I love her dearly. I think I just about have the oldest vehicle(s) in the complex currently. But, I'm not one for new, new, new. They tend to break, break, break easily I've found. I know the history of my minivan too. I'm a second owner of a lower milage fleet vehicle. She had about 20,000 miles on her and she came from Kokomo, Indiana and she was purchased from a local dealer and brought to Missouri where I acquired her and she's been mine ever since. She's been a great girl to me. She and I understand each other.
 

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....I would not hesitate to hop in it tomorrow and take it on a 500 mile trip.

So while I am not the original owner and don't claim to have put all the miles on this van.... Lets just say high mileage on vehicles don't scare me very much.
Keeping a vehicle in good maintenance order is what really matters.

When I got my first car (I was 16 at that time), first thing my dad taught me was to always keep the vehicle in good maintenance.

The vehicle should always be ready for a long trip. That means if you have to take a long drive today, all you need to do is gas up.

Glad you keep your vehicle in good maintenance too.

Seen many who needs to do some maintenance before a trip, that's a no-no for me. Even the fuel tank is rarely under 3/4 full unles I'm already traveling, on that case I let it go to 1/4 full.

High mileage doesn't really matters for me either, have some vehicles over 500,000 miles, still ready for an emergency long trip. My 2017 DGC already close to 200,000 miles, and counting.
 

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Some people gauge their cars and their components "wear" on miles, others gauge by hours. Not sure how accurate the miles theory is, since in crowded areas vehicles may spend hours idling on the freeway. The engine may see wear but not the rest of the drivetrain or suspension. Compare the data on police or other vehicles that have seen extensive idling time, and many 50K cars can show the equivalent of 200-300K mile of driving time. Now, this actually may not be bad, as I will explain why.

Now let me throw this out there. It has been shown that pretty much all engine wear occurs between startup until the engine hits operating temp - at that point they show immeasurable wear. The main reason for graphite head gaskets is primarily because the aluminum head and iron block grow at different rates, resulting in the head changing size, which slides the head across the deck and wears out conventional gaskets. One of the main reasons for torque to yield head bolts is they maintain more constant clamping pressure as the head grows and shrinks. But once the engine hits operating temp, that type of wear stops. The pistons have grown to their proper clearance. To over simplify - for the most part wear stops when the thermostat opens, due to everything being in it's intended range and the oil is cleaning itself and everywhere it needs to be.

So at that point - wouldn't "run cycles" a more accurate way of gauging wear that miles or hours? I have seen 40K mile engines flat wore out from short trip city driving, where the engine never came up to temp. The oil never got hot enough to burn off the condensate water and acids that build up during startup. There were a lot more "wear cycles" than a low mileage engine normally sees. On the other hand, I've pulled apart 250-300K mile engine cores to rebuild that were high mileage for the year - most likely highway miles - that still had good bearings and ring seal, and probably would have lasted a lot longer before actually needing service. They had far fewer heat cycles for their shown mileage would suggest.

So this is a brief (?) explanation why I don't always shy away from high mileage vehicles. The price is usually heavily discounted due to the miles, and properly driven and maintained can give a lot of service for the money. Not trying to start a huge debate - just tossing out a little info about mileage vs wear.
 

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A high mileage vehicle, with parts replaced, could be better than one still operating on OE parts. Everything part has a life. It's a worn part "in waiting".
 
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High mileage doesn't really scare me either.

I recently bought my mom a Honda CRV that now has almost 314k on it. According to the previous owner, it's supposed to have mostly highway miles. There is surprisingly little wrong with it, and most everything appears original. The few things I've found wrong with it would have normally gone bad 200k ago if it was just driven locally. And except for finding that it has a remanufactured transmission in it, my Chevy truck is pretty much the same at 242k.

I'd rather have a high mileage vehicle with no rust than a low mileage rust bucket any day.
 

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Some people gauge their cars and their components "wear" on miles, others gauge by hours. Not sure how accurate the miles theory is, since in crowded areas vehicles may spend hours idling on the freeway. The engine may see wear but not the rest of the drivetrain or suspension. Compare the data on police or other vehicles that have seen extensive idling time, and many 50K cars can show the equivalent of 200-300K mile of driving time. Now, this actually may not be bad, as I will explain why.

Now let me throw this out there. It has been shown that pretty much all engine wear occurs between startup until the engine hits operating temp - at that point they show immeasurable wear. The main reason for graphite head gaskets is primarily because the aluminum head and iron block grow at different rates, resulting in the head changing size, which slides the head across the deck and wears out conventional gaskets. One of the main reasons for torque to yield head bolts is they maintain more constant clamping pressure as the head grows and shrinks. But once the engine hits operating temp, that type of wear stops. The pistons have grown to their proper clearance. To over simplify - for the most part wear stops when the thermostat opens, due to everything being in it's intended range and the oil is cleaning itself and everywhere it needs to be.

So at that point - wouldn't "run cycles" a more accurate way of gauging wear that miles or hours? I have seen 40K mile engines flat wore out from short trip city driving, where the engine never came up to temp. The oil never got hot enough to burn off the condensate water and acids that build up during startup. There were a lot more "wear cycles" than a low mileage engine normally sees. On the other hand, I've pulled apart 250-300K mile engine cores to rebuild that were high mileage for the year - most likely highway miles - that still had good bearings and ring seal, and probably would have lasted a lot longer before actually needing service. They had far fewer heat cycles for their shown mileage would suggest.

So this is a brief (?) explanation why I don't always shy away from high mileage vehicles. The price is usually heavily discounted due to the miles, and properly driven and maintained can give a lot of service for the money. Not trying to start a huge debate - just tossing out a little info about mileage vs wear.
I've been guilty of running my mini with my beloved little Brussels Griffon in the car with the A/C running. He goes with me EVERYWHERE. We are hardly ever apart and I can't leave him alone, horrible separation anxiety.

So, I may have more "miles" on my mini than what the odometer is registering. I have left my mini running for six hours with the a/c on with my baby in the car while I was at a hair convention. He cries so much that I've gotten into trouble and I had to go to court for animal abuse for leaving him in a covered garage with the windows and sunroof open for 30 minutes while I was getting an appraisal for a home loan.

The home loan went through with flying colors, but I was called to court for leaving my dog in the garage. It was NOT HOT OUTSIDE, but he was crying so much that a fat old lady called the police on me. So, I leave the a/c running non stop for him whenever I have to leave him.

I've had other dogs that didn't make any sounds and I've not had any problems, but this one thinks he should be with me anywhere and everywhere. He's really good and can go into a restaurant and not steal from the table, but the rules in the US do not allow him to be with me everywhere, as in Paris, he would be allowed to sit with me anywhere. Been there and have seen it.

But, I do run my car if I have to go anywhere because I have a dependent with me at all times. I've even had a woman demand to put her hand inside my car to check the temperature! Can you believe it?

My mini is a workhorse and a babysitter. She's a hard worker. I do love her immensely. She's a really good girl.

LoveMyMini
 

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High mileage doesn't really scare me either.

I recently bought my mom a Honda CRV that now has almost 314k on it. According to the previous owner, it's supposed to have mostly highway miles. There is surprisingly little wrong with it, and most everything appears original. The few things I've found wrong with it would have normally gone bad 200k ago if it was just driven locally. And except for finding that it has a remanufactured transmission in it, my Chevy truck is pretty much the same at 242k.

I'd rather have a high mileage vehicle with no rust than a low mileage rust bucket any day.
Hondas have a really good reputation. AND, my mother had a Chevette that she loved, that thing had over 200,000 miles on it. That was THE ONE CAR that we had in our family that we didn't get rid of at the 80,000 mile mark. I think because mom loved it so much. She liked little cars. Easy for her to park and move around and she could actually see over the dash without having to sit on anything. Mom is a SPEED DEMON, by the way. Doing 75 in a 55 and she has gotten pulled over. Anyway, that little thing was nearly invisible. I don't think she pays any attention to the speedometer when she's driving, but she gets on dad when he's driving too fast. Shame, shame.

So, maybe Chevy's are good too.
 

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Chevys were good too. That Chevette was among the last good Chevys. Engine reliability started to decline in the 80s, death trap ignition switch went from early 90s until a few years ago, production of small engines was moved out of the US to Korea in the early 2000s, and a lot more reasons why not to buy a modern Chevy. For a reliable Chevy, make sure it came from the factory with a carb.

GM took Chrysler's 90s reputation and said "hold my beer". Now they make pretty cars that barely last the warranty, if that. Remember the 57 mile Corvette anyone? Got a customer at 600 miles until the end of her warranty that needed nearly $1,000 in work. Thankfully I got her into the dealer before she ran over the miles so it didn't cost her anything. Another Camaro owner doesn't want to sweat this year because his heat is stuck on full blast. We have to remove the windshield and dash to open the air box to replace a $20 air door that broke. His bill, if he chooses to go ahead with it will be around $1,500. He's 1 year out of warranty. I could go on for days on why modern Chevys are crap.

 

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Chevys were good too. That Chevette was among the last good Chevys. Engine reliability started to decline in the 80s, death trap ignition switch went from early 90s until a few years ago, production of small engines was moved out of the US to Korea in the early 2000s, and a lot more reasons why not to buy a modern Chevy. For a reliable Chevy, make sure it came from the factory with a carb.

GM took Chrysler's 90s reputation and said "hold my beer". Now they make pretty cars that barely last the warranty, if that. Remember the 57 mile Corvette anyone? Got a customer at 600 miles until the end of her warranty that needed nearly $1,000 in work. Thankfully I got her into the dealer before she ran over the miles so it didn't cost her anything. Another Camaro owner doesn't want to sweat this year because his heat is stuck on full blast. We have to remove the windshield and dash to open the air box to replace a $20 air door that broke. His bill, if he chooses to go ahead with it will be around $1,500. He's 1 year out of warranty. I could go on for days on why modern Chevys are crap.
Only problem I ever had with a Chevy was defective shocks on my 1996 Chevy pick up, and those shocks were not made by Chevy.

Other than that, never had any problems with any other Chevy, including Camaros, Pick Ups etc, and I could go on for days.... 😁

Note: I'm not a fan of any parricular vehicle manufacturer.

I actualy own vehicles from:

Dodge
Chrysler
Ford
Chevy
Delorean
Plymouth

To be fair, I've never had a problem with any brand.
 

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Chevy / GM is no worse than any of the other American car companies. They have all produced some poorly engineered junk at times, and they all have spotty quality control.

IMO, GM has actually made some really good vehicles over the years. Especially their full size trucks. Their cars with the 3800 (and 3300) V6 were usually pretty good, too.

I agree that their more modern Korean / Daewoo stuff is garbage, though. Kind of like Chrysler's Fiat crap.
 
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