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I’m gonna assume this post I’d dead because it is several years old. Did anyone get their van running? I’m having the exact same issue, took a while to throw a code but I finally got p1297. Sounds like my van is running on 3 cylinders (I have a 3.8l v6) let me know if anyone got it thanks
what year is your van?

have you tried replacing or inspecting the MAP sensor and its wiring? let us know what you've tried so far
 

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I’m gonna assume this post I’d dead because it is several years old. Did anyone get their van running? I’m having the exact same issue, took a while to throw a code but I finally got p1297. Sounds like my van is running on 3 cylinders (I have a 3.8l v6) let me know if anyone got it thanks
I'm typing-up a longer post to describe my current situation, that I will use to start a brand new thread. I've basically just tried changing the MAP sensor and visually inspecting the wires. I have not tried tracing the wires with my VOM yet. I'm still looking for places to find reliable information. I am experienced with electronics and electronic test equipment more than working on cars.

Hopefully I might be able to repaired the wire harness in the worst case I would be willing to replace the PCM.
 

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what year is your van?

have you tried replacing or inspecting the MAP sensor and its wiring? let us know what you've tried so far
It’s a 2003 Dodge Grand Caravan 3.8L. Before it threw the code I did plugs and wires, pcv valve, fuel filter, iac sensor and the camshaft sensor. I also cleaned the throttle body and tested a bunch of things. Nothing has worked so far it still sounds bad and like it’s running on 3 cylinders
 

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It’s a 2003 Dodge Grand Caravan 3.8L. Before it threw the code I did plugs and wires, pcv valve, fuel filter, iac sensor and the camshaft sensor. I also cleaned the throttle body and tested a bunch of things. Nothing has worked so far it still sounds bad and like it’s running on 3 cylinders
have you checked the fuel injector wiring harness? might be worth a look, it's a common fault for these kinds of problems
 

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I am also having a similar problem on my 2003 Dodge Grand caravan 3.3L V6....

I was looking into a membership to alldata.com at the DIY level. Do you find their memberships cost effective?
Check at your local community library. They may have a paid subscription or perhaps they may purchase a license if you ask a librarian to request it.

I think JeepMan has a link to an online service that is similar. Perhaps he will stop by and post the link.
 

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I am experienced with electronics and electronic test equipment more than working on cars.

Hopefully I might be able to repaired the wire harness in the worst case I would be willing to replace the PCM.
Hold yer horses... don't start throwing parts at your van just yet, that can get real expensive real quick.

The fuel injector harness, it was a problem for a few years where the factory installed the wiring too close to the exhaust heat. Many times the insulation gets to a point where it melts together and causes short circuit.
Continued vehicle operation when FI harness has shorted, MAY cause a internal PCM fault.

The injector harness should be removed and uncovered to inspect it and if you find it damaged YOU more than likely have the skill set and tools / materials to repair it.

You may be able to detect a short with a DMM at the connector behind the ignition coil. It is a 9 pin connector IIRC and it has a common (+) for all injectors and a PCM to ground wire for each individual injector. There are also a few conductors for the MAP.

Now, although the voltage to operate the injector is less than 12 vdc, the inductive kickback as the individual magnetic fields collapse can [generate] voltages, perhaps as high as several hundred vdc for an instant. As we know, higher voltages are easier to 'jump the gap' and may short even if a DMM shows no continuity or excessive resistance. That being explained, I think that it really should be examined visually.

Rover, you can remove the plenum and get to the fuel injector harness easily enough to disconnect it. Loosen the ten long bolts with a 10mm socket set and or wrenches. Disconnect the MAP wiring connector, throttle body connectors, three vacuum hoses and the large intake hose. Or you can remove the four bolts on the passenger side and disconnect the throttle body. Either way... Carefully remove the plenum [ plastic (or metal) air distribution ducting that 'says' "3.8L" ] and I'd suggest putting rags or towels over the cylinder intake ports so no bolts, screw, acorns can fall into the engine once you have the plenum removed.

IRAN the wiring harness.

While you are there, check each individual injector for consistent electrical resistance.

You should not need to replace any silicon gaskets, reuse them as long as they are not damaged or grossly deformed. Retighten all the bolts to snug, evenly. No need to over torque anything upon reassembly.

Please let us know what you find if you do take the top of your engine off. We just love pictures...

Cheers!
 

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I've found it easier to inspect the harness by loosening the power steering reservoir and moving it out of the way, then unplug the fuel injector harness and open the harness jacket (it's velcroed shut) to inspect the wires. It's that exact area where the wires melt anyway, so you'll know right away if you have to do the rest of the work above to remove the harness.

You can still buy a new replacement harness, or get a good one from a junkyard as I did. Take extra measures to shield the replacement harness from heat so it doesn't happen again.
 
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