The Chrysler Minivan Fan Club Forums banner

41 - 57 of 57 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I had to laugh at the removal of the hood. Make it more exciting.. keep the hood unlatched, with the rear bolts yanked...

Definitely a LOT more exciting to have the hood lift off and blow over the top of the van! I would also point to the beginning of this movie clip...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #43
Can a bad wire cause it to act up more when warn though? The longer i drive it the worse it gets.
 

·
--UNKNOWN MEMBER--
Joined
·
11,038 Posts
Personally I would never use an engine flush product, but instead just do very short (200-300 mi) OCIs with synthetic (which has additives designed to trap and isolate the nasty stuff that shouldn't be running around inside the engine). You need to do this until the drained oil looks clean. Can't tell you engine flush products aren't good - I just go by the fact that most automakers I'm familiar with say to use no oil additives, and I don't like the idea of putting anything in there except quality engine oil.

Think you have it wrong here.

Oils high in detergents, keep the "nasty stuff" running around inside the engine, then that "nasty stuff" would be drained out along with the oil on your next oil change, while that "nasty stuff" settles down in the oil pan (and other engine parts such as heads) if oil low in detergents is used, in this case, such "nasty stuff" would not be drained out in your next oil change.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Can a bad wire cause it to act up more when warn though? The longer i drive it the worse it gets.
I think you'll need to breathe, and start over with as few variables as possible. You're trying to makes sense of a lot of things and make one problem tie it all together.

Does the problem occur when at idle and not moving? That would eliminate the transmission, unless the torque converter is locking up and physically causing your engine to lag. But your engine could also be lagging due to a clogged air filter, faulty readings between MAF and O2, or have an idle air control circuit problem (it provides air when your throttle plate is closed). The throttle plate could have gunk on the back side at idle, closing off that very thin area around the throttle plate. Throttle body cleaner and a toothbrush can help here... (open the plate by hand with the side springloaded portion, don't push the plate itself)

Check fuel pressure. If you don't have a fuel pressure port (my van didn't!), it's easy to find on another van in the junk yard and swap out that part of the fuel system. It connects up to the end of the fuel rail.

See if you get consistent spark with an inductive pickup on a timing gun. Your eyes can see the flashes and any gaps that show up.
Check short/long term fuel trims. (there are TONS of REALLY good videos on interpreting those, and can help you isolate problem areas)

Look for codes.

Heat can always affect things differently than when cold. You can get expansion of materials, even solder joints that can cause readings to be misinterpreted.

I use a software product on my phone called "TorquePro" which has nice graphing features for my short/long term fuel trims. You can use a cheap OBD connector tool, with total cost being $25 or so.

There's a tool you can use (android phone only I believe) called DRBThree which has the ability to pull all kinds of codes. The interface is a little clunky, but it's pretty nice.

If you're getting bad rattling from CV joints, that should be irrespective of time/heat. But I don't think that's going to cause lagging unless they're at such a point that you should NOT be driving the vehicle.

As for a tranny flush. I wouldn't do one with a power flusher, but you CAN disconnect the tubes from the tranny going out to the cooler, and attach your own external hoses. Have the exhaust tube go into a bucket, with a funnel going into the other one where you pour in ATF+4 rated fluid. It will naturally push the fluid out, and not force it like those power flush machines do. Use clear tubing and you'll see when it gets pink.

Don't over complicate things... Be methodical. Look at WHEN the problems are manifesting itself, and try to isolate operations to minimize the possibilities.

Learn engine controls.

It's trying to maintain a stochiometric ratio of 14.7 parts oxygen to 1 part gasoline. 1st and last sensors do that.. That would be the mass air flow sensor (MAF) before the throttle body and the O2 sensors at the end. MAF works by putting a certain current across the wire causing it to heat up and provide a known resistance. Air rushing past it being sucked into your engine cools that wire. (Temperature/humidity are taken into account by other sensors here) When that gets dirty, the readings can be thrown off. You CAN clean the sensor, but ONLY with an approved (and expensive) cleaner.

One trick you can do is unplug sensors one at a time, and if it affects the car differently, that's usually working properly.
If it doesn't then you need to determine if it's needed for that mode of operation. (You will throw codes with this method though, so be prepared to clear them with any reader worth it's salt. And some codes go away after 2-3 hot/cold drive cycles.)

You of course have sensors that deal with timing (camshaft/chrankshaft position sensors), but those two first sensors I mentioned provide the main inputs for how long the fuel injectors stay open so that the proper fuel amounts are injected. The position sensors provide the WHEN of the injection and when for the sparking.

Low fuel pressure can mess with that. Also realize that you have two primary modes of operation, depending on whether the engine operating temperature is normal or cold. When it's cold, it's using internal tables (and rich fuel mixtures) to run. When temps get proper, it starts to rely on sensors mentioned above for fuel/air mixture ratios. That's why it's so important to look at fuel trims.

If you're not finding your car getting into hot operation, look at temperature sensors, or see if there's a big air bubble in the system or malfunctioning sensors, etc.


Be methodical.. take care of the easy stuff. MOST problems are still mechanical in nature.. fuel pressure is one of them. You can test pressures with the key on and engine off, when you hear that whine for a few seconds before starting the car.

There are parts that maintain fuel pressure, since the fuel pump likely operates all the time. (Fuel quality can matter as well if you're finding problems occurring after buying gas at a particular station or already have other contaminants in your tank) If the fuel pressure regulator is messed up, you'll have low pressure as well. Some Gen 4 vans have fuel filters. Some don't. if yours does, see if it's clogged, which will affect fuel delivery, particularly at higher speeds. A weak fuel pump can do that as well. Heat can affect it too. But the number of miles seems a bit low, but consider if the van was stored for considerable lengths of time, causing bad deposits in the fuel tank to build up (fuel turns to a kind of clumpy varnish when allowed to sit for a long time.)


Again, learn engine controls and WHY they're there. Trust me... if they weren't needed, manufacturers wouldn't add them. Fuel trims are your friend.. they'll guide you to your problem if it's engine related.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,820 Posts
It still does it with the engine off.
So, rolling in neutral, you shut off the engine carefully, and the 'shuddering' continued... you have something binding up in the rolling chassis.

If you believe the CV joints (axles) are worn out to the point where they are on the verge of locking up...
I'd spend my first dollars there.

I'd rather be stranded somewhere with an engine that is not running well, than lying somewhere, shiny side upside down in a ditch due to a catastrophic wheel lock.

Please be careful, especially if you have passengers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
I have an 03 t&c with only 64K & im the 2nd owner. For 3mo ive had an issue i cant figure out. At 30-45 mph it shudders & shifts a little hard at time and kinda feels like a bad torque converter & idles low & rough at stop lights. The fluid is pink & clean. The cel is not on but had it scanned anyway & nothing. Now it jerks at all speeds & im at my wits end. Please help. Thanks
It's an old van. You may have some worn out bushings on the lower control arms and definitely check your motor mounts and tranny mount. My mounts went bad it stopped my shaking problem. I bought them from a place on the east coast
. Massachusetts or around there. I googled motor mounts for a 2001 Dodge Grand Caravan. I took the one I bought at prelims back cause it was 45$ and the one online(identical part only more heavy duty)was only 10$. The one I bought from Woefully was manufactured in South Africa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #48
Thank you for all that info. I will definately be going thru all of it. I have new cv's ill be installing on sat. Just did new busings and balljoints in sept. I need link pins but those wouldnt cause any of these issues. If this van was a few years older id have it licked. Ill keep you posted as to what i come up with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #51
Think you have it wrong here.

Oils high in detergents, keep the "nasty stuff" running around inside the engine, then that "nasty stuff" would be drained out along with the oil on your next oil change, while that "nasty stuff" settles down in the oil pan (and other engine parts such as heads) if oil low in detergents is used, in this case, such "nasty stuff" would not be drained out in your next oil change.
I use full synthetic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
The trans isnt slipping.
It's not just for slip, that was just part of the front label I read, it helps with hard shifting too, helps with worn parts and adds lubrication. Made a world of difference to my 2000 F150 that was starting to have hard shifts and some shuddering and I was scared to do a flush at that point, but every vehicle is different.

It's simply called Lucas Transmission Fix

57428
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #53
It's not just for slip, that was just part of the front label I read, it helps with hard shifting too, helps with worn parts and adds lubrication. Made a world of difference to my 2000 F150 that was starting to have hard shifts and some shuddering and I was scared to do a flush at that point, but every vehicle is different.

It's simply called Lucas Transmission Fix

View attachment 57428
Ok thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
If something mechanical is binding and shuddering when rolling in neutral and switching off the engine , no amount of snake oil additive will fix that. Make sure you isolate the issue: is it CV's , is engine misfiring or is it both?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,820 Posts
Change the transmission output shaft (axle seals) seals while you there changing the axles.
Inexpensive and easy leak insurance.

I know they only have less than 70k miles but the age...

I am subscribed, I anxiously await further updates and findings.
Bon Chance !
 
41 - 57 of 57 Posts
Top