The Chrysler Minivan Fan Club Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Video
The tailpipe is visible in the video because I hadn't taken the rest of the exhaust system out from under the car, it was still disconnected though.

If anyone was thinking of doing this for whatever reason, it's a pretty simple process. I didn't even have to jack it up, although that would have made it easier.
My main goal was to do this non destructively (no cutting, no welding, etc.) That way I could put it back on easily if need be.
First I loosened the vband clamp that attaches the pipe from the cat to the rest of the exhaust. (Took me about 30-45 minutes to unscrew the *** nut lol.)
Then I unscrewed the bolts holding the hangers in place. One hanger on each side of the muffler. And one hanger on the resonator.
After that, I pulled the exhaust off of the pipe from the cat, and took it out from under the car.
Finally, I got some steel zip ties ($8 for a pack of 10 at AutoZone) to support the pipe coming off from the cat, as there are no hangers to support it.
57334

57333


Overall, I'd say the sound is reasonable. (Do note that this is coming from an 18 year old who wants a car much faster than a Caravan.) The highway noise is not very loud, and it doesn't drone much at all. In gears 1 and 2 you can really hear it though, and I think it sounds pretty good. Nowhere near as fart-canny as a straightpiped 4 cylinder, or as loud and obnoxious as a straightpiped v8.

Hope this post was interesting/helpful if you wanted to try this for some reason.
 

·
--UNKNOWN MEMBER--
Joined
·
10,546 Posts
If anyone was thinking of doing this for whatever reason....
Finally, I got some steel zip ties ($8 for a pack of 10 at AutoZone) to support the pipe coming off from the cat, as there are no hangers to support it.
Hope this post was interesting/helpful if you wanted to try this for some reason.
First, I hope your grandparents never see this, I really do.

Second, I hope no body is thinking on doing this for any reason.

Third, you don't use metal ties, wires etc. to hold muffler components in place, use exhaust rubber hangers instead.

And lastly, I hope no body find it interesting/helpful.

Thanks for sharing anyways. It might help someone to know what not to do.
 

·
fix it if you can
Joined
·
4,848 Posts
LEVY, you think he'll prove Darwin's theory on natural selection?
(with the loose pipe next to 16+ year old gas tank and evap system, known for fuel pump gasket / retaining nut failure)

Gramps04Mini, that van better be registered and insured in your own name - lawyers won't be kind to the owner should something tragic happen on the roads.
 

·
3rd gen > all others
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
Proper hangers, and run some pipe all the way to the rear bumper. Otherwise you will have exhaust fumes getting inside through the side windows, and the hot exhaust will melt/ruin the rear shock on that side. Also, it will cause the van to rust out much faster on the side and rear. Plus, proximity to the plastic fuel tank...
 

·
--UNKNOWN MEMBER--
Joined
·
10,546 Posts
LEVY, you think he'll prove Darwin's theory on natural selection?
(with the loose pipe next to 16+ year old gas tank and evap system, known for fuel pump gasket / retaining nut failure)

Gramps04Mini, that van better be registered and insured in your own name - lawyers won't be kind to the owner should something tragic happen on the roads.

Ha,ha.

Yeah, Darwin's theory at it's fullest!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Third, you don't use metal ties, wires etc. to hold muffler components in place, use exhaust rubber hangers instead.
I actually agree with you, hangers are the best solution. However, it's not very feasible to create new mount points for a hanger. If I wanted to do this right, I would have welded a pipe onto the cat, and put hangers up in the old mount points. However, like I said, my goal in doing this was to make this non destructive and completely reversible. Like you said, it was my (great) grandparents minivan, and I wouldn't want to permanently tarnish it.

LEVY, you think he'll prove Darwin's theory on natural selection?
(with the loose pipe next to 16+ year old gas tank and evap system, known for fuel pump gasket / retaining nut failure)

Gramps04Mini, that van better be registered and insured in your own name - lawyers won't be kind to the owner should something tragic happen on the roads.
Don't worry, I made sure it wouldn't hit the gas tank, nor any other component, even at full extension. If the steel zip ties were to break (unlikely, especially considering I am only doing this temporarily) the pipe would fall straight down, not posing a risk to the gas tank.

Proper hangers, and run some pipe all the way to the rear bumper. Otherwise you will have exhaust fumes getting inside through the side windows, and the hot exhaust will melt/ruin the rear shock on that side. Also, it will cause the van to rust out much faster on the side and rear. Plus, proximity to the plastic fuel tank...
Basic Newtonian mechanics can dispel any worry about fumes seeping in. The piston gives the gasses a negative acceleration, the car has a positive acceleration. Even if the fumes stayed there, the fumes seeping into the window would be as big of a problem as fumes from another car at a light seeping into your window. If the rather indirect fumes were as bad to plastic as you claim they are, you would see melted bumpers everywhere. The radiant heat from the pipe is worse than the heat from the fumes anyways. I suppose the additional fumes could catalyze the oxidation of metal, but I would think this effect would be nearly negligible. Also, the temperatures required for gasoline to spontaneously combust are too high for the fumes to ignite it.

With that being said, if damage does occur either from the pipe hitting something, or something melting from the fumes, y'all will be the first to know.
 

·
3rd gen > all others
Joined
·
2,513 Posts
I speak from experience. My 2000 had a rusted out muffler that rusted the passenger sliding door out. The rust went beyond the door seal, and the fumes were getting in and making me sick while driving. I stopped driving the van because of this, until I replace the rusted out door. I've already replaced the muffler and hanger for $75. The seam on the factory muffler rusts out first, and the seeping fumes creep around to the side and rust that area out.

Furthermore, this is why the exhaust system exits on vehicles are always after the passenger compartment. Japanese cars aren't allowed to have slip-fit unions on the exhaust before the passenger compartment either (if at all). Fumes coupled with humidity causes stuff to rust out fast here in the rust/salt belt (I live where they salt the roads).

I bought a 2001 parts van to fix my 2004 T&C AWD, and it was all rusted out. The side of the muffler was blown wide open, a piece of dryer vent metal loosely wired to it to try to "fix it", and a melted and blown out nivomat shock on that side (other shock was fine with 225,000 miles on it). The dogleg was also about gone, and heavy rust on wheel arch and bottom of door. When I removed the interior, there was a hole rusted THROUGH THE FLOOR right above the muffler.

Fumes igniting gas? Well, it was exhaust heat that caused some Chevy Astro vans to go up in flames. The rubber fuel line on top of the tank would crack with age, spray gas onto the exhaust pipe, and start the van on fire. No rubber fuel lines on our vans in that area, but there are quick line disconnects that could potentially leak or spray in that area, and sometimes the fuel pump flange cracks and leaks gasoline right down the side (and length if on a hill) of the tank.

I know it's temporary, but there are parts out there that can be temporarily bolted on to secure stuff. If it were me, I would get a length of exhaust pipe to bridge where the muffler was to the tailpipe, lightly clamp it in place, and use some bolt-on hangers to secure it to the chassis. I've used some before that clamped around the pipe, then had a rubber hanging strap with several holes so you could adjust the height, with a metal bracket on the other end with a hole for bolting to an existing hole/threaded hole on the "frame".

Thanks for the thread and video, which inspired me to watch other videos and make a decision on my own exhaust. I need a muffler for my AWD van, and think I'll go with a Thrush turbo muffler. I'm going for an off-road look for my van and want a sound to reflect that. :)
 

·
fix it if you can
Joined
·
4,848 Posts
Don't worry, I made sure it wouldn't hit the gas tank, nor any other component, even at full extension. If the steel zip ties were to break (unlikely, especially considering I am only doing this temporarily) the pipe would fall straight down, not posing a risk to the gas tank.



Basic Newtonian mechanics ...
You seem like a nice kid, probably just didn't pay attention in your physics class.
The only reason I take the time to type out the following is because you seem to be nice, yet shortsighted.

Start with Boyle's law - you're dumping hot exhaust gas around the fuel tank, it warms up the fuel (gasoline) and that accelerates evaporation (turning liquid into gas). The gas pressure builds up and pushes against old plastic and rubber components (valves, lines, connectors, gaskets, etc). Eventually (and that can be any moment at 16+ years old materials exposed to elements) something will fail and start dumping fuel vapors (or worse liquid) into atmosphere. You might get a check engine light and Evap code and hopefully won't just ignore it (or you might not).

Now one fine day (or night) you might be sitting in traffic trying to get to wherever you're going and some jerk next to you will drop a cigarette butt out the window or will be driving along and the pipe will drop and scrape on the pavement producing sparks or your van or car / bike next to you might backfire and IF the fuel concentration is right, that van will go up in flames before you can call the fire dep't...

So next time you drive it, you better wear sneakers and non flammable clothes and be ready to run fast should it catch on fire.
(and yes, I know you're invincible and nothing like that could possibly happen to you so no point in saying someone could T-bone you or the like)
 

·
--UNKNOWN MEMBER--
Joined
·
10,546 Posts
The only reason I take the time to type out the following is because you seem to be nice, yet shortsighted.

Start with Boyle's law - you're dumping hot exhaust gas around the fuel tank, it warms up the fuel (gasoline) and that accelerates evaporation (turning liquid into gas). The gas pressure builds up....
This is the exact reason why NHTSA got away with return fuel lines. Noticed vehicles nowadays doesn't have fuel return lines anymore?

NHTSA noticed fuel was being returned to the fuel tank warmer (or hoter if you will) than it originally was. This cycle was repeated over and over untill you had a fuel tank full of hot gasoline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
You seem like a nice kid, probably just didn't pay attention in your physics class.
The only reason I take the time to type out the following is because you seem to be nice, yet shortsighted.

Start with Boyle's law - you're dumping hot exhaust gas around the fuel tank, it warms up the fuel (gasoline) and that accelerates evaporation (turning liquid into gas). The gas pressure builds up and pushes against old plastic and rubber components (valves, lines, connectors, gaskets, etc). Eventually (and that can be any moment at 16+ years old materials exposed to elements) something will fail and start dumping fuel vapors (or worse liquid) into atmosphere. You might get a check engine light and Evap code and hopefully won't just ignore it (or you might not).

Now one fine day (or night) you might be sitting in traffic trying to get to wherever you're going and some jerk next to you will drop a cigarette butt out the window or will be driving along and the pipe will drop and scrape on the pavement producing sparks or your van or car / bike next to you might backfire and IF the fuel concentration is right, that van will go up in flames before you can call the fire dep't...

So next time you drive it, you better wear sneakers and non flammable clothes and be ready to run fast should it catch on fire.
(and yes, I know you're invincible and nothing like that could possibly happen to you so no point in saying someone could T-bone you or the like)
While the not paying attention in class comment may be legitimate, I am still aware of Boyle's law, although it was chemistry where I learned it. The danger you are describing seems highly situational. The tank should absorb more heat from the pipe as opposed to the actual gasses, especially in a low powered, naturally aspirated engine such as the one we have. Especially when you consider the wind blowing the particles around, they will reach equilibrium with the atmosphere very quickly, and not be capable of transferring much heat at all to the gas tank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,882 Posts
It sounds a lot like a piped GM 3800.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Your joking here right, and going to install a proper exhaust, but had some fun half way through?

If not joking......A straight piped front wheel drive minivan. Why again?

Is this somehow "cool"? Ummm, .....no.

Putting a wing on the back next? Maybe jack up the back and put on some 60's wide rubber back there too?

I had 4.3 liter performance exhaust on a rwd Astro tow vehicle, but not a straight , short pipe. That was a more truck like van too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Maybe jack up the back and put on some 60's wide rubber back there too?
Ha ha. Back in the mid 70s a buddy got a 1st generation Ford e series SWB van. That's a lot smaller than a Chrysler shorty. Took out the motor & tranny and put in a 351 from a LTD. If I remember correctly we had to cut the drive shaft to about a foot or two with that giant engine/tranny. With all that weight it looked jacked up. Can’t remember what kind of exhaust we rigged up – I think home made side pipes. I swear at any speed if you stomped at it it would start spinning the rear tires like crazy, at any speed.

Looking back as a teenager it sure was cool. As a mature adult “coffin on wheels” comes to mind. It ain’t funny but it sure was fun ha ha.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Your joking here right, and going to install a proper exhaust, but had some fun half way through?

If not joking......A straight piped front wheel drive minivan. Why again?

Is this somehow "cool"? Ummm, .....no.

Putting a wing on the back next? Maybe jack up the back and put on some 60's wide rubber back there too?

I had 4.3 liter performance exhaust on a rwd Astro tow vehicle, but not a straight , short pipe. That was a more truck like van too.
Just having some fun. Everyone at my school knows I'm one of the most unlikely people to drive a minivan, so I figured I'd have some fun with it. It's also funny to see people's reactions when I rev my van.
I'd want to do more mods to it, but I'm saving up for a car of my own, so I don't want to do anything that costs money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I have a straight pipe from the cat back on my 1998 T&C. I had it done at a local muffler shop, and it's all welded up to the old pipe, where it had broken off before the muffler, and ran out the rear in the factory location. They used proper rubber mounts, and welded the hold downs from the mounts to the pipe. It's nice and solid, and no more fumes in the van. When I bought the van, the previous owner had removed the muffler and tailpipe, since it had broken off, and left it that way. The only rust on the van is where that pipe was expelling all of the exhaust, and it was getting into the van. Any exhaust fumes entering any vehicle is a bad idea. I, too, like the sound of the exhaust without the muffler or resonator in place. From the cat back is just pipe. Cruising it sounds nice, and not too loud either ( at least I don't think it is), but accelerating it is quite loud with a nice throaty rumble. If anyone does choose to do this, at least have it done properly so there's no leaks. Be prepared to be pulled over for excessive noise, as I have been. At the time that was my cheapest option, and all I could afford. If I didn't have to fix the exhaust leaking into the van as soon as I did, and dealing with the lack of money at the time, I would have put a muffler on it rather than a straight pipe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
438 Posts
I did straight pipes for a while... Was too damn loud. Sounded like I was matting the pedal at 1/8 throttle. And it wasn't a full straight pipe setup either. It was a straight pipe in place of the large muffler. Replaced that with a Boral ProXS perforated straight-through muffler. Now it's barely louder than stock until I stomp it and it has that nice bass-y tone. If it weren't on a minivan, I'd use the term "panty dropper". :p
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top