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Good to hear you accomplished the task and now have training in lowering the spare tire. Did you inflate to 60psi?
Using Rust Check or similar penetrating / rust inhibitor spray on the mechanism yearly should prevent any problems with operation. WD40 isn't as long lasting / effective.
 

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thanks Jeepman, i did not inflate to 60psi, the tire said max of 44 i think?
I will look into getting that rust preventing spray, i never heard of it before but will look at my store.
 

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Max of 44psi sounds like a regular size tire and probably should have 36 psi. as a working pressure. The small spares usually require more psi as stated in big letters on the tire. Mine says inflate to 60psi.

For Rust Check see http://www.rustcheck.com/
 

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mine is a full size spare. just inflated it to the max pressure. I will do the yearly removal and PSI check from now on in. thanks again
 

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Full size spare is an excellent choice in the event of a flat.
Tires tend to lose air with time per the following site, that contains excellent information, on tire inflation.
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=1
If you do use your spare, my suggestion would be to drop the pressure back to what the other tire are carrying at that time.
Happy Motoring! :eek:nline2lo
 

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I had the same problem with my 1995 Voyager and my 2000 Voyager. The '95 was rusted in place, whereas on the 2000, there's a tab that seems to snap into place when you overtighten it (as a shop might tend to do if they pulled the spare back up using an impact wrench.) The only way I could figure to get it off was to loosen the wheel as much as I could (which only caused it to lower a bit) and then use a socket to remove the spare tire holder assembly. Once down, I finally saw what was causing the problem, and bent the metal tab out of the way.
 

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Y'all scared the whatzit out of me -- my 2002 base model Voyager has never had the spare down, much less used it. I went back last night and cranked 'er down...to the third turn, where it hung up. Fortunately, rocking it back and forth freed it up. The cable was clean, and there was almost no rust on the rim and mechanism, so I shot it up with silicone spray and cranked it back up. Aired the spare (full size) back up to 40 psi, and made sure the nipple was at the back for easy checking.

Thanks for highlighting this overlooked critical maintenance item (although, really, how critical is it if you can go 6 years without even checking it?)!
 

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Y'all scared the whatzit out of me -- my 2002 base model Voyager has never had the spare down, much less used it. I went back last night and cranked 'er down...to the third turn, where it hung up. Fortunately, rocking it back and forth freed it up. The cable was clean, and there was almost no rust on the rim and mechanism, so I shot it up with silicone spray and cranked it back up. Aired the spare (full size) back up to 40 psi, and made sure the nipple was at the back for easy checking.

Thanks for highlighting this overlooked critical maintenance item (although, really, how critical is it if you can go 6 years without even checking it?)!
6 years without a flat tire is a great record, but ......... that flat tire could be awaiting you when you are rushing off to the car races tomorrow or to work on Monday.
And your emergency brake ... have you used it in an emergency lately, or in the last 6 years ... you may need to today.
And your battery ... no maintenance for the past 6 years maybe ... but will your engine start tomorrow with a battery on its last legs?
Just food for thought. :biggrin:
 

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6 years without a flat tire is a great record, but ......... that flat tire could be awaiting you when you are rushing off to the car races tomorrow or to work on Monday.
And your emergency brake ... have you used it in an emergency lately, or in the last 6 years ... you may need to today.
And your battery ... no maintenance for the past 6 years maybe ... but will your engine start tomorrow with a battery on its last legs?
Just food for thought. :biggrin:
Don't let that oversight give you the wrong impression. The spare, she's "out of sight, out of mind."

We change the oil on a 3,000 mile schedule since most of the van's trips are short. We've done two transmission fluid/filter replacements, fuel and air filters on a regular basis, and we get a deluxe detail on the interior at least once every two years.

We use the e-brake pretty often, as the van sits on our sloped driveway fairly frequently.

And our OEM battery died at the 2-year point (replaced under warranty), and I just replaced THAT battery last summer (shocked the heck out of the auto shop, who told me the battery in place was still in good shape). Here in the hotter climes, batteries that last 3 years are rare -- and I don't wait to see if they'll last 4.

I also had the upper/lower rad hoses, heater hoses, and v-belt replaced last fall. The mechanic was kind enough to point out that my tensioner was rusted in place...so I got a new one of those, too. And I just had the shocks and struts replaced 'cause it was getting a bit too boat-like wallowing down the road (and that included the strut mounts, which were starting to bang on bumps).

Other than a few minor mechanical issues (rear brake cylinders leaking, bad wheel hub, ABS computer, aircon expansion valve clogged and an evaporator leak), we've had good luck with this vehicle.

The driver's side window has locked up on me, and it's about time to replace the spark plugs, but so far it's a keeper, with just over 65,000 miles on it.
 

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Don't let that oversight give you the wrong impression. The spare, she's "out of sight, out of mind."

We change the oil on a 3,000 mile schedule since most of the van's trips are short. We've done two transmission fluid/filter replacements, fuel and air filters on a regular basis, and we get a deluxe detail on the interior at least once every two years.

We use the e-brake pretty often, as the van sits on our sloped driveway fairly frequently.

And our OEM battery died at the 2-year point (replaced under warranty), and I just replaced THAT battery last summer (shocked the heck out of the auto shop, who told me the battery in place was still in good shape). Here in the hotter climes, batteries that last 3 years are rare -- and I don't wait to see if they'll last 4.

I also had the upper/lower rad hoses, heater hoses, and v-belt replaced last fall. The mechanic was kind enough to point out that my tensioner was rusted in place...so I got a new one of those, too. And I just had the shocks and struts replaced 'cause it was getting a bit too boat-like wallowing down the road (and that included the strut mounts, which were starting to bang on bumps).

Other than a few minor mechanical issues (rear brake cylinders leaking, bad wheel hub, ABS computer, aircon expansion valve clogged and an evaporator leak), we've had good luck with this vehicle.

The driver's side window has locked up on me, and it's about time to replace the spark plugs, but so far it's a keeper, with just over 65,000 miles on it.
Good job, you take great care of your vehicle. Some, if not most, that read this thread will not be as deligent.

Batteries up here last about 5 years before they become liabilities. I am waiting for Wal-Mart to have a sale to buy a new one for my Jeep. If not, I will replace in September anyway. Replaced the one in the Van last Summer, and it was still working fine at the time.

As for your window, I would go with the complete regulator & motor assembly for around $100.00 (parts). I replaced my Driver's side the Summer of 2005 and the Passenger's side the Summer of 2006. No problems since then.

Lots of info on here about replacing spark plugs. May as well do the wires too. Maybe even the PCV valve, since you will be in that area.

Have you given any thought to replacing the power steering reservoir before your power steering gets noisey? Those reservoirs apparently have a filter that can get dirty. I replaced mine this Summer and am going to cut the old one in two to see what it looks like.

Take care and enjoy your well maintained Van.
 

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And your emergency brake ... have you used it in an emergency lately, or in the last 6 years ... you may need to today.
My emergency brake seems much more like a parking brake. I swear it wouldn't do much in an actual emergency. Do you think it would?
 

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6 years without a flat tire is a great record, but ......... that flat tire could be awaiting you when you are rushing off to the car races tomorrow or to work on Monday.
And your emergency brake ... have you used it in an emergency lately, or in the last 6 years ... you may need to today.
And your battery ... no maintenance for the past 6 years maybe ... but will your engine start tomorrow with a battery on its last legs?
Just food for thought. :biggrin:
DUDE! Now you got me worried about everything!
 

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DUDE! Now you got me worried about everything!
Sorry about that. :biggrin:

If you have a flat tire (Somebody is having one this very mnute, I had a blow out on the right rear of my Jeep just last month - sharp rock - tire had about 4 -5/32ths tread depth left), you may need your emergency brake in top notch working order to "block" your wheels, say for a front flat. That jack, that comes with the vehicle, gets a pretty good hold on the vehicle, but won't resist much forward / backward movement. Been there / done that - twice over. I don't carry any blocks with me and I doubt that many do. If lucky, there may be some suitable rocks, along side the road, for blocking. Don't let the alligators get you. :jpshakehe

As for the battery, that's the heart of the vehicle's operating system. With a weak battery, the current will be flowing all over the place. The show (lights blinking, wipers operating without being turned on, etc.) will be tremendous but your vehicle won't be going anywhere soon. A jump start may cure that if the battery was just run down (lights left on or something) otherwise, battery replacement, if it has aged sufficiently, will be the cure.

I service my emergency brake yearly (inspect, clean, lubricate) and use it often. That works for me.
As for the battery, I replace in the 6th year, after five years of use. 5 years seems to be about the expected useful life in this climate, based on my experience.
 

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My emergency brake seems much more like a parking brake. I swear it wouldn't do much in an actual emergency. Do you think it would?
I was in a vehicle several years back that was having brake issues. Eventually the pedal went to the floor coming into some merging traffic. The emergency brake saved us there.

It can lock up your rear wheels pretty good, if it is working properly.

It's uses are:
- parking brake, as you say, and even more useful in that regard with a standard shift transmission.
- keeping the rear wheels from moving when changing a front wheel (flat tire for example) and no blocking is available.
- applying braking pressure, possibly lock up, to the rear wheels in an emergency stop due to hydraulic brake failure.
 

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mine is a full size spare. just inflated it to the max pressure. I will do the yearly removal and PSI check from now on in. thanks again
I recommend inflating it to the recommended pressure on the vehicle (36, in this case), and checking it whenever you check the other tires. That way, it's always got the right pressure.

If you have it at maximum pressure, and you get a heat wave, it will be over the max pressure. This summer, we traveled from Virginia to NY. When we started out, the tires had 36 psi all around, and temps were in the 80s (farenheit). In NY, nighttime temps got down to the 50s. Had to stop and air up before traveling, because the tires read 33.
 

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Today, I got a flat. Actually, the wife got it, being that she was in the driver's seat and didn't see the giant but easily avoidable pothole... anyway, here goes.

This is a 2002 T&C eX.

1. My donut is stuck. The winch cable cranks fine, but the tire stays up close to the body. I'm wondering if this is the "bent tab" issue mentioned above possibly? The donut will spin freely and wobble plenty but will not release itself, despite plenty of pounding and pulling. If the guys replacing the flat don't get this figured out tomorrow I'll probably end up pulling it over a pit and going as medieval as necessary on it. The donut's 6 years old anyway so I should replace it, which brings me to...

2. I see talk of full size spares here. I would like to get a matching rim from a yard. Will that fit in the spare storage area of my vehicle? I'm hoping that it will since the 02 with towing package apparently came with a full size (which I'm hoping is stored in the same spot using the same winch... is that correct?) I just put 4 new tires on less than 2 weeks ago (and thankfully bought road hazard coverage) but only 3 were totally shot so I saved the one that would have passed inspection. So I will locate a matching rim and if the attached tire is inferior to the one I saved I will get that one mounted. I'm just hoping someone can reassure me that I can store this under the van once I solve #1 above.

3. Should I allow her to drive when I'm in the vehicle after this? Kidding, of course.

BTW the short term solution to #1 was to have a friend who has a 2007 DGC loan me his donut which thankfully lowered and came out of its cute little tray without incident, and was the match I'd hoped for. Not sure if all 4g have the same lug pattern, but these two matched up right if anyone was ever wondering.
 
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