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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I have a 95 voyager 3.0l with about 245,000 km/147,000 miles on it. From the maintenance records that came with it, it hasn't had a timing belt replaced since at least the 156,000km/93,000 mile mark. (That was when one of the previous owners started keeping records, and when the transmission was replaced.)

It's been a cheap, reliable ride so far, but it needs a lot of components replaced, as well as the timing belt and I'm trying to decide whether to keep it and get it all fixed, or buy a newer one. So I've decided to conduct a survey and find out how long Voyagers, and Chrysler mini-vans in general last. What is the longest you've gone without replacing the timing belt? How many miles/km does your minivan have on it and how long do you plan on keeping it?

Thanks,

Charlotte

Thanks
 

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What's the condition of the body and Everything else? If you are not changing the timing belt yourself, it will be an expensive repair relative to how much the van is worth.

I think you should just keep driving it until it dies, doing minimal maintenance like oil changes and brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Fortunately, I have a friend who spins wrenches and so far, he's willing to trade his work for my work on his back yard. I've also been able to get cheap parts from Rock auto. The body looks like crap, but the frame is still solid. I need a van for my business, and my fear is that I could end up buying one that needs more work than the one I got. My other worry is putting all this work into it, only to find out it self-destructs anyways.
 

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I had a 1999 Voyager with the 3.0L engine, and I really liked it. It had been poorly maintained by its previous owners, and the valves made ticking noises, and one cylinder had poor compression, but it still ran adequately, and had decent performance. This engine can really take a beating!

I changed the timing belt at approximately 202,000 miles, and the van was destroyed in an accident less than 2,000 miles later. I have a 4-cylinder van now, and it's not nearly as good as the 3.0 V-6. It doesn't even have enough power to maintain freeway speeds with the A/C on. The A/C in the Voyager never worked for me, but I assume the 3.0 could handle it.
 

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I have good news for you: should your timing belt break, the 3.0 Chrysler/Mitsubishi is a non-interference engine. The valves will not bend. I did two timing belt break services on two 3.0s in the last 24 months; once a new belt is installed and the engine started, they run fine.

As for timing belts: I'd say replace every 75K miles. Barring that, I always replace whenever I get a new vehicle. Better safe than sorry. The 3.0 takes time to replace the belt, due to the accessory plate and all, but it gets easier the more you do it.
 

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My 2000 has over 300,000 miles. I plan to keep driving it until I can't get parts anymore. I replaced the heads but the bottom end of the engine is original. I've done the timing belt numerous times and fixed all the leaks including sleeving the cams. If you do your own work it can be worth it. If you rely on a mechanic it can get very expensive.
 

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Just replaced the timing belt and water pump on mine at 245,000 miles. It still had OEMs.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hello, I started this thread back in February 2015, and I've had my 1995 Voyager since June 2011. It had 215,176 km at the time. Unfortunately, I no longer have this van. It finally self-destructed in October of last year/2018 at 248,678 km. It was 24 years old. It was really rusty and had a leaky head gasket, which I wasn't going to fix. But what really killed it was the fuel pump. However, in the 7 years/33,502 that I've owned it, it has been cheap to fix and maintain, thanks to all the help from you guys. I never did bother to replace the timing belt, since it would have cost more than the van was worth. Now I own a 2006 Uplander, which doesn't even have a timing belt. (It runs well and I needed a new van in a hurry, so that's why I bought it.) I was really sad to say goodbye to my Voyager, and I'm sad to say goodbye to this forum.

Love and Light,
ChaOs
 

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Hi, I have a 95 voyager 3.0l with about 245,000 km/147,000 miles on it. From the maintenance records that came with it, it hasn't had a timing belt replaced since at least the 156,000km/93,000 mile mark. (That was when one of the previous owners started keeping records, and when the transmission was replaced.)

It's been a cheap, reliable ride so far, but it needs a lot of components replaced, as well as the timing belt and I'm trying to decide whether to keep it and get it all fixed, or buy a newer one. So I've decided to conduct a survey and find out how long Voyagers, and Chrysler mini-vans in general last. What is the longest you've gone without replacing the timing belt? How many miles/km does your minivan have on it and how long do you plan on keeping it?

Thanks,

Charlotte

Thanks
These aren't interference engines, so I run my timing belts by condition. If the belt looks good, no cracking, worn teeth, etc, don't worry about it. My 1994 still had the original belt at 205k when I pulled the motor to do a swap. That engine is currently at 245k in my car, still on the original belt, I planned to change it before putting it in the car, but the replacement belt I got was already in worse shape than the original, so I left it.

IF you want to keep up on it, 80-100k is the change interval, so you should be good to around 180,000 miles given it was done at 93,000.

As for replacing parts, I get everything on RockAuto, parts stores can't even begin to compete with their prices.

My 1994 has about 250k miles on the body, 135k on the trans, and 40k on the motor. I expect to get another 100k out of it before I think about getting rid of it.
 
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