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Replacing front struts and on the last lug nut I attempted to loosen I rounded ALL the shoulders on the nut. Tried hammering on a variety of metric and SAE 6 point sockets without any luck. Any suggestions ?
 

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Could use a die grinder or similar drill attachment to make two flat sides on the rounded nut for a wrench. Cut through on the end of the nut just barely to the stud so you can squirt some PB Blaster or penetrating oil in and let it sit for a while, then tap on it with a hammer. Then try to wrench it off. New studs are cheap but be careful not to damage your wheel. Maybe fashion a shield to go over the nut before you start grinding.
 

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Try using a 12 point socket if you have. You can try the special removal sockets and other suggested methods as well. If all else fails then drilling it out will be your best bet. You’re less likely to damage the wheel during removal and it’s faster. Gradually increase the size of the drill bit that’s drilling through the nut and stud. Replace nut and stud once it breaks off.
 

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Are you fighting the OE two-piece lug nuts (with factory OE aluminum wheels)? They have a cheap chrome cap over the actual nut:

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If this is what you have, you can tap an awl through the tin cap and wriggle it off the actual nut (which is hollow all the way to the stud). Once the cap is off, you can use an 18mm socket and breaker bar to remove the nut. Then replace with quality, made-in-USA one-piece lug nuts, like these Gorilla nuts (part number 41138HT), available on eBay for a bit over a buck each.

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Just went through this last week.

If you have other than OE two-piece nuts, please disregard.
 

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I've had this problem twice ... The first time "I fought the nuts and nuts won" I didn't have problems getting a socket on there, but I did discover that there are 4 different size nuts that are may be installed from factory or after market ... 18 mm, 19 mm, 3/4", and 25/32" all with an M12 -1.5 thread!

Mine were 19mm. I tried undoing them to change from summer to snow tires ... a couple were seized on one wheel, and worse one of those sheered the stud! I was reluctant to go any further myself, so took it to the garages about 1/2 mile from home along with a box of 10 new studs and 10 new 19mm nuts. They replaced 4 studs and 8 nuts.

Second time, changing back to summer tires I fought the nuts and the this time the nuts DIDN'T win. But this is where I ran into the second wrinkle. I couldn't get my socket on some of the original nuts. Used a friendly persuader and off they came. Each of the nuts that I had this happen to were the chrome cover over the steel nut type. The flats on the nuts had rusted and swelled the chrome cover hence the problem getting the socket on! But I discovered why I had the problem with the seized nuts ... took these swollen nuts off ... and they were stiff but not seized. But rusty water dripped out of the covers. The water in there caused the steel nut to rust down the thread and so it went stiff ... and worse seized.

I cleaned up all the studs with a brass wire wheel and got a set of 20 replacement nuts!

Now they go on and off perfectly! It was a challenge getting the 19mm nuts locally mind! Our local tire sell everything except food for everyone kept trying to sell me the oversized 25/32 nuts!!!! I couldn't convince him that that was the wrong size!!! I am distrusting CTC more and more! (Last week same store tried to sell me the wrong ATF!)
 

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There's a few things going on when lug nuts are hard to remove.
  • lug nuts could be 19 mm and not 3/4" for example (wrong socket)
  • socket is at an angle/not fully on the nut (poor practice)
  • ss caps on lug nuts have been beaten up and distorted by impact wrenches, especially during removal (poor practice)
  • overtightening and/or stretching (poor practice)
  • improper lighting (energy conservation gone wrong)
  • not using a light lubricant on the threads to counter corrosion (Fluid Film deficiency)
:)
 

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  • not using a light lubricant on the threads to counter corrosion (Fluid Film deficiency)
Lug nuts should never be lubed because it interferes with torqueing the nuts properly. When lug nuts work loose it is almost always because of lube on the threads.
 

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Loose wheel? What's that? Never had one on my vehicles. No, never. All these years. :)

I don't lubricant the seats. That's a no, no. I do spray a thin coat of Fluid Film on the mating area (back) of the rim. A coat of anything thick on the back side of the rim can produce a hydraulic layer, and subsequent wheel loosening SO THEY SAY.

I torque the nuts to spec and check about 10 minutes later at 5 additional ft.lbs. and the wrench clicks out. I will check again, later on, say a week, after some driving

Don't use lubricant any where near an impact wrench when tightening.

There was a time when Tire Rack, I believe, said to lubricate the threads. It was one of the tire companies.

Interesting Stuff: Sure you could use anti-seize on your studs, but???
Don't use AZ on lug nuts? Not so sure about that. My Porsche owners manual says to use "anti seize paste" on the threads and washers but not on the cones that contact the wheel. Porsche is very conservative in all their requirements to ward off liability and lawyers. Good enuff for me.
Interesting. They think it's the cone of the lug nut and it's contact with the wheel that set the torque. I never thought of it that way
 

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This was definitely rusty threads ... the inside of the old nuts were coated with brown dust and the threads on the studs were also rusty sand. The few nuts that came off easily as they should had no evidence of rust!
 

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There's a few things going on when lug nuts are hard to remove.
  • lug nuts could be 19 mm and not 3/4" for example (wrong socket)
  • socket is at an angle/not fully on the nut (poor practice)
  • ss caps on lug nuts have been beaten up and distorted by impact wrenches, especially during removal (poor practice)
  • overtightening and/or stretching (poor practice)
  • improper lighting (energy conservation gone wrong)
  • not using a light lubricant on the threads to counter corrosion (Fluid Film deficiency)
:)
Or the stud has issues! :)
 

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Or the stud has issues! :)
The issue is usually the nut doing the wrenching. :) Wrong socket, wrong angle, wrong grip, all wrong. Doesn't take much to bugger up a nut or bolt head.

Don't ask me about taking out the bolt holding on the steering wheel for the Jeep, to replace the clock spring. :).
 
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There's a few things going on when lug nuts are hard to remove.

  • not using a light lubricant on the threads to counter corrosion (Fluid Film deficiency)
:)
Every car manufacturer warns you against using any kind of lubricant on the stud threads.
 

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Lug nuts should never be lubed because it interferes with torqueing the nuts properly. When lug nuts work loose it is almost always because of lube on the threads.
When I use antiseize on bolts, I use 20% less specified torque. No issues in several decades of wrenching.

For the lug nut bolts, I've been using one of the old mechanic's tricks One drop of used motor oil in the middle of the threads. Supposedly this is just enough to prevent galling/rusting, but not enough to affect dry torque specs.

The only times I've ever had an issue with lug nuts loosening on me was when I had a shop do something for me.
 

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Every car manufacturer warns you against using any kind of lubricant on the stud threads.
When I was in university for engineering, one of the final exam questions was "Explain from first principles why threads should never be lubricated when torqueing". The answer required calculations of force, friction, and yield strength. One of 4 questions in a 3 hour exam so the expected answer was far more than a paragraph or two.
 

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When I use antiseize on bolts, I use 20% less specified torque. No issues in several decades of wrenching.

For the lug nut bolts, I've been using one of the old mechanic's tricks One drop of used motor oil in the middle of the threads. Supposedly this is just enough to prevent galling/rusting, but not enough to affect dry torque specs.

The only times I've ever had an issue with lug nuts loosening on me was when I had a shop do something for me.
You're just lucky, that's all.
 

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Every car manufacturer warns you against using any kind of lubricant on the stud threads.
Warnings are usually in a "Warning Box". I can't find the Chapter and Verse in my Owners Manual that contains that box. :)
The best they give is "clean or remove any dirt or oil before tightening". That would be from the wheel and wheel hole surfaces, of course, considering how dirty and oily the spare wheel can get from dust, sand, road salt and rustproofing..

Also can't find how much a lightly lubricated stud changes the residual clamping force by, still looking, and came across this interesting Chart (Page3)
A comparison is easy enough to make using my torque wrench and Jeep wheels, which I will be working on soon. I can determine the torque to loosen close enough (dry vs lubed) after a week or so time..

Interesting information here about the mating surfaces being free of basically anything, including old paint, that can compromise the clamping force.
What You Don't Know About Your Wheels Can Hurt You
OH NO! This can't be real. :)
Before installing the nuts, place 2-3 drops of motor oil on the clean threads of the studs and 1-2 drops of motor oil between the washer and the nut on the two-piece flange nut. This process reduces friction and allows you to achieve a desirable clamping force once the wheel is torqued down.
Something to think about:
In a nutshell, torquing a dry bolt has two issues. One, on an overall basis you produce less clamping force by torquing a dry bolt. Two, and much more important, is that the clamping force variation from bolt to bolt is far higher with dry bolts than it is with lubed bolts. That is intuitive when you think about it. The variation bolt to bolt produces leaks and warpage in the parts you are joining.
We don't use the "star" pattern for no reason. It helps with consistency and is one of the reasons I torque up in stages.

Reading:
Best Practice for Wheel Torque and Clamping Force

A brand new steel rim, from Walmart, for a spare tire comes to mind. I thought, when putting the wheel on, that the paint looked thick and I should check the lug nuts for torque, after running for awhile. Sure enough they had to be retorqued, two or three times, before I felt comfortable with the result. It was only on the vehicle for a short time and then carried in back for a spare tire.
 

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Worked on the Jeep last Wednesday, had the front wheels off. Gave the studs a quick spray of Fluid Film, from a compressor driven sprayer, before reinstallation. Torqued nuts to 100 ft.lb. moving. Checked 10 minutes at 105 ft.lb. static. Wrench clicked out.

The Jeep has been on the road 4 times since then.

I checked the break away torque today. The torque wrench clicked out (loosening) at 100 ft.lb. but budged the nuts loose at 105 ft. lb, two taking a second try, let's say 106 ft.lb. for those two.

So, is there any problem with that clamping force? Are the Jeep's wheels going to fall off? Over time, experience tells me, the break away torque will be higher. Why's that?
 
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A former co-worker had a chart on bolt torques used by Rocketdyne in LA. They make rocket engines, like the giant F-1 on the Saturn V, so bolt torqueing is meticulous. It said that adding oil to the threads does not change the torque to resulting tension relationship, it just makes the results more consistent. Adding a high-pressure dry lubricant like molybdenum-disulfide ("moly") to the threads doubles the resulting tension (so best not to use it). Some wheel bearing greases have moly. I vaguely recall it said that lubing the head/washer of the bolt can double the tension, so lube only the threads, and best to use a thinner oil, even WD-40. I wouldn't use silicone lubricant, since they gave no data. Not applicable to wheel studs, but never fill a blind hole with oil, as that can cause you to hit the torque early from hydro-lock which will later leak off to leave the bolt loose.
 
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