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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I did a simple, I thought, radiator drain and refill and probably didn't follow the best procedure but any way it's been spewing air out of the bleeder screw now for about an hour and is still spewing. Anything I need to do to speed this up or do different? Temp is staying between 230 -240 with bleeder open and heat on high. The cap is tight.

2016 town and country
 

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Have you squeezed the hoses? Took care of my Jeep when I did it recently.


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Discussion Starter #3
I shut it off, filled the radiator back up, squeezed the hoses and it seems to be to a point where it's ok now. I think my problem was I put the radiator cap on and left a LOT of space in the radiator.
 

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The 3.6 takes some patience to get all the trapped air out. I found bringing the revs up to 2000 then opening the bleed screw helps.
Hank
 

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Don't forget to open the bleeder when you are adding coolant. It's there to make sure the thermostat is submerged. That's the proper way, while squeezing the hoses does pretty much the same thing just less effectively. Not doing that could lead to that infinite bleeding symptom. Opening it with the cap on is pretty much pointless.

For really stubborn air pockets, rev the engine between 2-2.5k with the heat on max. When the vents start to feel like a hair dryer, shut it down to cool then top it off.
 

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It's on the top of the thermostat housing for 5th gens with 3.6L. Not sure on a 2002. There's several engines for that year.
 

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I never mess with that little bledder, never ever had a problem. My thinking is, if air is already on that side of the thermostat, then it doesn't needs to be bleed, and it can easily flow to the radiator neck.

Problem would be if air is trapped on the other side of the thermostat, preventing it to reach the proper temperature on time.
 

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A bleeder on the opposite side of the thermostat would make more sense. The way it's setup is to submerge the cold side and then rely on the one-way bleeder valve in the thermostat to let the coolant through.

I don't show a bleeder on the 3.8. If one does exist it would be near where the top hose connects to the engine, but since it's a straight hose to the radiator a cold-side bleeder wouldn't do much. And there's not much place to put a hot-side bleeder with that coil pack sitting right on top of the thermostat housing.
 

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A bleeder on the opposite side of the thermostat would make more sense. The way it's setup is to submerge the cold side and then rely on the one-way bleeder valve in the thermostat to let the coolant through.

I don't show a bleeder on the 3.8. If one does exist it would be near where the top hose connects to the engine, but since it's a straight hose to the radiator a cold-side bleeder wouldn't do much. And there's not much place to put a hot-side bleeder with that coil pack sitting right on top of the thermostat housing.
Agreed (what? :oops: ). But since coolant is already flowing for whatever one way valve is there (it might not be present on all thermostats), it doesn't help much, I would think. Hot coolant is already moving towards the thermostat. As soon as thermostat opens, trapped air will rush to the radiator and stay at the radiator neck waiting for the first oportunity to get out.
 

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Agreed (what? :oops: ).
I only disagree with you when I know you're wrong. Doesn't happen all the time. But as hard as you like to argue it sticks with you.
 
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