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Just a thought - I suspect if you're seeing the mileage drop, it is because there is something going a bit wrong - like an oxygen sensor getting lazy or the cylinders becoming unbalanced due to slightly uneven compression or unbalanced injectors.

- G
 

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When you watch the mileage drop over the years of ownership, it's kind of frustrating. I used to be able to get 25 (US)Mpg on a highway trip until a couple years ago ... I can now get 21 to 22 ... (was 19.5 to 20 before the brake repair)
have you even considered how BAD gaasoline has gotten over the years? There is nowhere near the BTU content now as than
 

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Slow down

Seriously. When I vacationed in Ontario, and was driving on backroads with lower speedlimits, I had no problem average 30 mpg (2000 Voy, 3.0L). The gas mileage for my van seems to be the best at about 50 mph, although at that speed, the van feels like it isn't moving at all and the other drivers probably want to kill you.




My best tank of gas was when I taped the seams and used the cruise control at about 52 mph. Windows closed, no A/C. I got about 35 mpg on that tank. With the tires overinflated a bit (I've been driving around recently with them at 45psi, and they seem to be holding up fine, although it feels like I'm driving on rocks), and some work done to reduce weight, 40 mpg seems perfectly achievable. Heck, 45mpg is probably doable, but I'd probably end up dead, between the other drivers on the road and my better half.
 

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50-55 MPH is about where I get my best economy also, when I can drive that.

Be careful when over-inflating the tires (literally). Most passenger car tires specify either 35 PSI or 44 PSI for maximum cold inflation pressures. If your tires say 44, and you're running 45, that's probably not a big deal (in terms of tire damage). But if your tires are only good for 35 PSI, I'd really hesitate to run them much over 37-38 PSI, if I ran them higher than 35 PSI at all.

I'd also try them at 40 PSI, just for kicks. They say there's a point at which your tires can be TOO inflated, in terms of fuel economy, because the extra inflation pressure causes increased friction (operation) of the struts and actually causes increased forward drag. In addition, when the tires are too inflated, they can hydroplane easier and cause unpredictable handling.
 

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I keep my tires inflated on the high side, drive 65 or less, keep my spark plug wires in good shape (upgrading to the higher quality Beldon wires from NAPA helped) and avoid using the AC whenever possable (this really drops the MPG fast). Make sure the O2 sensors are up to par.
The spark plug wires tend to melt on the back side of the engine. The NAPA wires have a metal shield arround the boot and have a better conducting wire.
Switching over to a K&N air filter made no change at all
 

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It may just be the tires I have on both of my vans, but I keep both vans inflated at least to 42 PSI, even though the door sticker says 35PSI. Whenever I have my tires at 35 PSI they look very under-inflated and flat to me. I've thought perhaps I had bad tire pressure gauges, but I've tried a bunch with the same conclusions.

For those of us with the 3.3L and Long-Wheelbase vans that 40-45 MPG will only ever be a figment of our imaginations... forget those of us with the 3.8L, Long-Wheelbase, AND heavy-duty towing package and transmission cooler. Even a 3.3L Short-Wheelbase seems too much of a stretch for 40mpg... because that would mean having a Town & Country/CaraVoyager up there competing with a Honda Civic in fuel economy. (Haha, can you imagine THAT "Car and Driver" article?)
 

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It may just be the tires I have on both of my vans, but I keep both vans inflated at least to 42 PSI, even though the door sticker says 35PSI. Whenever I have my tires at 35 PSI they look very under-inflated and flat to me. I've thought perhaps I had bad tire pressure gauges, but I've tried a bunch with the same conclusions.
EDIT: I thought you said the "tire" says 35 PSI max, and I wrote what I did below. I re-read and saw that the door sticker says 35 PSI. If your tires will allow cold inflation pressures that high, please kindly disregard what I wrote below.

I would very seriously re-consider. Regardless of how the tire LOOKS, if the maximum inflation pressure is specified as 35 PSI, running it 20% overinflated is running a serious safety risk.
 

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Mpg

after reading all these post about mpg, ive decided you guys havnt had it so good, my 3.3 voyager does about 15 around town (with my lead foot). over her in the uk were paying £1.20 a ltr.. thats around $2.00 so im not getting so much for my pound
 

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Mpg lucky me

Like Greensleeves I'm paying about £1.20 up to a whopping £1.28 per l however I run a 2000 Grand Voyager with a 2.5 Turbo Diesel and am getting 34 mpg when the little lady runs about town :( or up to 42 mpg on longer runs :thumb: pity you guys over the pond can't get the old oil-burner over there, only problem is tech info on diesel engine is nowhere in the haynes comicbook :lol:
 

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after reading all these post about mpg, ive decided you guys havnt had it so good, my 3.3 voyager does about 15 around town (with my lead foot). over her in the uk were paying £1.20 a ltr.. thats around $2.00 so im not getting so much for my pound
£1.20 is actually $2.34 at the moment - so that's $8.84 per US Gallon.:eek:

15 mpg round town ? :eek: you sure do have a lead foot !
I average 18 mpg round town simply by keeping the engine to a max 2000 rpm, and that's despite living near Burnley where I can't go anywhere without driving up hill.
 
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