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I don't live in the rust belt, and I couldn't count on the fingers and toes of everyone in my shop how many spring clamps I've seen rusted out on Northern cars. On average, I have to cut off 2 rusted out clamps each month that have lost the opening fingers to remove them and no longer hold proper tension. And on cars that aren't rusty, I can often solve leaks by replacing weak spring clamps with worm types. Some of them have been so weak I could remove them by hand. After about 3 years, I don't trust a spring type clamp to hold.

As for worm gear clamps, I've seen a handful go bad. Usually it was over tightened and the worm gear pushes against the band and lifts up the cage that holds the worm gear causing it to slip. I'd say this happens once to every 30 or 40 failed spring clamps.
Whatever type of clamp you use it seems that the rubber is stuck to the fitting and wouldn't leak there anyway.?
 

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2010 Dodge Grand Caravan 3.3L had one of the plastic Y pipes going to the heater core inside the engine bay burst and dumped all my coolant, causing the engine to overheat and I got the chime. When it chimed I immediately pulled over, was 100 yards from home at that point, let it cool down naturally and drove it the rest of the way. After I replaced the Y pipe with the Dorman aluminum one and filled it back up with coolant (2 1/2 gallons) I took it for a test drive. When I turned it on initially there was no problems while I warmed it up and bled the cooling system of air. But as soon as I backed out of the drive way and put it in drive it started misfiring, and withing 50 yards it set a misfire code on cylinder 3. Drove it 1/2 mile and back to verify, and yes, a bad misfire. No codes on any other cylinder. Before I yank the heads off and replace the head gasket, taking the heads to a shop to have them look at them and get them ready to be re-installed, is there any thing else I should be concerned with? I haven't seen any evidence yet of coolant getting into the crank case. I have not pulled the spark plug in cylinder 3 yet, I'll do that tomorrow. Both Y pipes have now been replaced with aluminum ones, wish I had done that before the failure, but hindsight is 20/20. Thanks for any advice.
First replace your distributer, plugs and wires before u tear the engine apart. My dist went out about the same time as my y pipe
 

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Coolant hoses, especially, expand during normal operation. This will cause leaks if the clamp doesn't hold tight. If a spring clamp connection fails, it's due to the clamp losing tension. If a worm clamp fails, it's due to the hose deteriorating. Unless it's cheap or very old rubber, you should never have issues with worm clamps.
 

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Those worm type clamps are just terrible. I have them on the plastic pipe going from my pressure tank in the house out to the well head and down in the well for over 100 feet. They have been there for 18 years except for a couple that were replaced when the pump was changed last year. I sure wish I had used spring type clamps. Ha, ha.

Some seem to think that stainless steel worm type clamps don't expand and contract. News for them, they do, but uniformly so, without flexing of any cheaply made spring..

As for frequency of failure of spring type clamps, on one hand, I can count 4 failures, involving three vehicles. The guys at a local shop see it frequently, sometimes blaming it on being opened up too much during previous work. Guess they don't make them like they use to.

Worm type clamps are readily available. Ever see a spring type clamp for sale at a drug store?

Bottom line: Spring type clamps work well when not made out of substandard material for the job. Worm type clamps are more available, adjustable and dependable.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it. :)
 

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Whatever type of clamp you use it seems that the rubber is stuck to the fitting and wouldn't leak there anyway.?
That's a point and has saved many a spring type clamp.
 

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[
Brass is not good for your aluminum radiator, use an aluminum tee or "Y" if possible.

Your tee might never leak again, but your radiator will eventually.
I believe this was discussed some time back. The pH of the coolant, and corrosion inhibitors, can make bad things go away.

Why are Brass Fittings Preferred by Truck Manufacturers?

METAL CORROSION

Effect of Inhibitors on the Corrosion of Automotive Aluminum Alloy in Ethylene Glycol-Water Mixture
 

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To the OP: I doubt you fried anything. I drove my 2009 a LOT more than you did in bursts when it overheated, and it was perfectly fine. I thought I'd fried the head gasket because of how I had to push it to get it home, but it never had any issues for many thousands of miles after! It's probably wires/plug or other stuff mentioned.

MAY THE ENGINEER THAT DECIDED ON PLASTIC Y PIPES DIE A SLOW PAINFUL DEATH!!! My 2009 had not one but TWO failures of the same darn pipe! It went, got replaced with another plastic one... Then failed AGAIN less than 2 years later. I bought the aluminum, and would never use anything else. Incidentally my "new" used van ALREADY has the Y replaced with an aluminum one! Wonder how that could be if they don't fail ALL THE TIME???

I'm all in on worm style. If for no other reason, if you have to do field repairs, it's pretty easy to get your hands on a screwdriver even if you don't already carry one like I do. I've never really had much in the way of failures for either style, but I don't like working with the tension ones, and I don't like the way they work in theory. It seems like they must eventually wear and go bad as people here say they have had happen.
 

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2010 Dodge Grand Caravan 3.3L had one of the plastic Y pipes going to the heater core inside the engine bay burst and dumped all my coolant, causing the engine to overheat and I got the chime. When it chimed I immediately pulled over, was 100 yards from home at that point, let it cool down naturally and drove it the rest of the way. After I replaced the Y pipe with the Dorman aluminum one and filled it back up with coolant (2 1/2 gallons) I took it for a test drive. When I turned it on initially there was no problems while I warmed it up and bled the cooling system of air. But as soon as I backed out of the drive way and put it in drive it started misfiring, and withing 50 yards it set a misfire code on cylinder 3. Drove it 1/2 mile and back to verify, and yes, a bad misfire. No codes on any other cylinder. Before I yank the heads off and replace the head gasket, taking the heads to a shop to have them look at them and get them ready to be re-installed, is there any thing else I should be concerned with? I haven't seen any evidence yet of coolant getting into the crank case. I have not pulled the spark plug in cylinder 3 yet, I'll do that tomorrow. Both Y pipes have now been replaced with aluminum ones, wish I had done that before the failure, but hindsight is 20/20. Thanks for any advice.
I have repaired several of these for $25 with KW block seal. It works and it permanently fixes small head gasket leaks caused by overheating. I always remove the thermostat and flush with water first, then refill adding the block seal. I have had them stop in under a minute, oil like choclate pudding from water, expansion plug leak, whatever. Worth the try, but take your time and do it right.
 

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I believe this was discussed some time back. The pH of the coolant, and corrosion inhibitors, can make bad things go away
Corrosion inhibitors doesn't help with bimetallic corrosion or galvanic corrosion.

Only way to avoid galvanic corrosion is by using 100% pure water, which is nearly impossible.

PH has nothing to do with galvanic corrosion.

The only way to avoid galvanic corrosion would be using pure distilled water. Distilled water is very aggressive, so it would not be pure water for long.

Those links you posted have nothing to do with galvanic corrosion.

?
 

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Corrosion inhibitors doesn't help with bimetallic corrosion or galvanic corrosion.

Only way to avoid galvanic corrosion is by using 100% pure water, which is nearly impossible.

PH has nothing to do with galvanic corrosion.

The only way to avoid galvanic corrosion would be using pure distilled water. Distilled water is very aggressive, so it would not be pure water for long.

Those links you posted have nothing to do with galvanic corrosion.

?
Who is ready for the long thread on galvanic corrosion again? :)
 

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Dorman makes an aluminum crossover pipe as well with the following note:
Dorman aluminum crossover pipe: More Information for DORMAN 9023102HP
OE PROBLEM
The original equipment design uses plastic material, prone to cracking and leaks

This Dorman OE FIX engine coolant crossover pipe has been redesigned using durable aluminum
Looks like the crossover pipe can leak as well.
 

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Dorman....what could go wrong?
Usually I would agree! But it's a stupid hunk of metal that seems to be thick enough for the purpose. I don't see how even Dorman could screw this part up!
Not all parts made by Dorman are junk, just like not all parts made by OEMs are good. Otherwise we would not have a discussion about leaky Y pipes on Chryslers.

These companies have huge networks of lower tier suppliers, so not all parts are made to the same standards even though they may bear the same company name.
 

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Not all parts made by Dorman are junk, just like not all parts made by OEMs are good. Otherwise we would not have a discussion about leaky Y pipes on Chryslers.

These companies have huge networks of lower tier suppliers, so not all parts are made to the same standards even though they may bear the same company name.
Oh, I know. I've had some proper horrible Dorman stuff before, but plenty has been alright too. Probably never gonna buy a power window motor from them again! The reality is with a lot of stuff, like this part, it's just hard to screw up much. The material choice is really the only thing of importance here, and aluminum gets the job done better than plastic. Ditto for plenty of other parts. I guess in theory your milling/casting could be so far off on a simple part it doesn't physically fit, but that's almost harder to do than doing it right.

I will buy Dorman stuff when it seems to be the best call... But I'll still smack talk 'em a bit too! The biggest reason I end up not buying Dorman stuff much is I usually try to buy stuff made in the USA, or at least some other respectable nation, and that usually ends up being OEM or higher end aftermarket. I have a variety of reasons for that, one of which is that the quality is usually (but not always) higher.
 

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Dorman parts can be a little rough around the edges. I bought a Dorman power steering reservoir once and the nipples for the hoses were only half finished. The Mopar ones were much smoother. Otherwise Dorman parts have worked well. They seem to be be the biggest supplier of aftermarket parts, covering lots of bases.

A lot of Chrysler Mopar replacement parts are made in Mexico. Cheap labor, or it was.until the labor standards got renegotiated (more equalized) under the new NAFTA.
 

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Dorman parts can be a little rough around the edges. I bought a Dorman power steering reservoir once and the nipples for the hoses were only half finished. The Mopar ones were much smoother. Otherwise Dorman parts have worked well. They seem to be be the biggest supplier of aftermarket parts, covering lots of bases.

A lot of Chrysler Mopar replacement parts are made in Mexico. Cheap labor, or it was.until the labor standards got renegotiated (more equalized) under the new NAFTA.
Yeah, regarding that last bit, I kind of have a hierarchy of places I will buy from, and it depends on the type of product too. You just can't find most electronics made in the USA or Europe or whatever, even Japan or South Korea are tough nowadays! But approximately USA (or Canada!) first, then Europe and Japan, followed by a long list that I wouldn't immediately be able to put in any particular order! China is last on my list.

I like to support American and other first world countries manufacturing jobs, as I think most politicians have completely thrown the industry under the bus, even though it's still vitally important to a functioning society. I like to know the people making my stuff aren't working in horrible conditions. I like that the quality is usually better. Then there are political things. China is a ruthless dictatorship that has dreams of throwing their weight around 10 times as hard as the USA has (which I've never been a big fan of anyway)... I dunno that they're a great country to build up! Supporting jobs in Mexico or friendly countries like India even doesn't bother me so much. Especially with Mexico, them fixing their internal problems helps ease up those problems overflowing to our side of the border.

I wish more people thought through the long term repercussions of $1.99 t-shirts and the like...
 
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