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2010 Dodge Grand Caravan 3.3L had one of the plastic Y pipes going to the heater core inside the engine bay burst and dumped all my coolant, causing the engine to overheat and I got the chime. When it chimed I immediately pulled over, was 100 yards from home at that point, let it cool down naturally and drove it the rest of the way. After I replaced the Y pipe with the Dorman aluminum one and filled it back up with coolant (2 1/2 gallons) I took it for a test drive. When I turned it on initially there was no problems while I warmed it up and bled the cooling system of air. But as soon as I backed out of the drive way and put it in drive it started misfiring, and withing 50 yards it set a misfire code on cylinder 3. Drove it 1/2 mile and back to verify, and yes, a bad misfire. No codes on any other cylinder. Before I yank the heads off and replace the head gasket, taking the heads to a shop to have them look at them and get them ready to be re-installed, is there any thing else I should be concerned with? I haven't seen any evidence yet of coolant getting into the crank case. I have not pulled the spark plug in cylinder 3 yet, I'll do that tomorrow. Both Y pipes have now been replaced with aluminum ones, wish I had done that before the failure, but hindsight is 20/20. Thanks for any advice.
 

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I think you should be okay. Check the plug and wire for that cylinder.

I received the aluminum Ys last week for my 2016. Like you say, best to be preventative with those low quality connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Dorman makes both plastic (47238) and aluminum (47238HP). Got mine from Rockauto.
I too used the Dorman Aluminum one. Got mine at my local O'Reilly Auto so I could go ahead and get it done. Amazon also has them. If you go to a parts store and ask for them, and you have an '09-10 they'll tell you it won't work with your vehicle. For some reason in their systems (at least at my local Advanced Auto) they have it working on the 2008 only. But Dorman's site said it would work, and it does. Pretty easy, but if you have the original factory setup you may have to do some cutting no big deal, this kit gives you everything you need. A previous owner of mine already swapped out the factory Y pipes for the plastic dormans.
 

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I think you should be okay. Check the plug and wire for that cylinder.

I received the aluminum Ys last week for my 2016. Like you say, best to be preventative with those low quality connectors.
Thanks. I tend to overthink things sometimes. I will check both plug and wire just on the off chance that it's a simple issue. But more than likely a blown head gasket. Found a good step by step video on how to replace the head gaskets on these things, and it's not as involved as I was afraid it was going to be. But just wanted to see if the collective knowledge here had anything else I should be looking at before I start tearing the engine apart. I may go ahead and get a leak-down tester just to make sure the rings are still good and maybe put my bore-scope down into that cylinder while I have the plug out just to make sure there's no scoring on the cylinder wall. I'm hoping it's "just" the head gasket that needs replacing and cylinder heads need looked at by a machine shop.
 

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Thanks Jeepman, just ordered two.
I don't like the worm screw clamps this kit comes with. I will order some constant tension clamps.
5/8 constant tension clamps
You're welcome.

Constant tension clamps are a waste of money. They lose their tension/rust out. :)

Stainless steel worm type clamps are the best, just ask LEVY. :)

PS: LEVY needs something to argue about, don't let him know I said that. ?
 

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Question:, Do models without rear heat (AVP/CVP) utilize the "Y" connector?
 

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You're welcome.

Constant tension clamps are a waste of money. They lose their tension/rust out. :)
You might be correct, but....

Any idea why no vehicle manufacturer ever uses worm type clamps anymore?

To save money? (before you even try).

No, they can maybe save a few cents per vehicle, buy they can easily add $1.00 to the final price and make a good profit, no one would complaint for that extra dollar.

Before you listen to someone who is against constant tension clamps and also against synthetic oil, do your own research and post results.
 

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Just a couple of clampy tidbits LEVY:
1. BMW Coolant Hose Clamp Parts

Those Germans know how to clamp hoses.

2. This: https://community.cartalk.com/t/what-are-the-best-clamps/86961/5
Prowrencher, I’m not even going to respond to such an insulting rely, especially when it shows an absolute lack of understanding of how worm drive clamps work. Don’t do that anymore.

And by the way, the reason manufacturers use spring clamps is because they’re faster and cheaper to install. I qualify that with 23 years of engineering and management experience in manufacturing organizations.

Go take some engineering courses. Learn how things work. And learn how to express different preferences without insulting others.
:)

As for synthetic oil, what makes you think I'm against it? I think it's great stuff once I get beyond the "fake" synthetic name it has. It's still petroleum based, not "synthetic". There are actual synthetic oils out there i.e. Group Base IV, from across the ocean, but they are not the "synthetic" oil commonly referred to in NA.
Is "synthetic" oil over hyped/over marketed? Yes, well beyond its actual benefits.
Does "synthetic" oil have a longer oil change interval. Yes, and for that it makes some sense to use it.
Does "synthetic" oil contain an additive package? Yes, so does conventional oil.
Does "synthetic" oil have a lower Pour Point than conventional oil? Pretty much the same due to Pour Point depressants. A few years back, Castrol GTX conventional oil was better than their "synthetic" in that regard.
Would I use "synthetic" oil? Yes, Pennzoil 5W-30 synthetic oil is in my 2016 right now, with about 12,000 kms on it, waiting for the change oil light to shine. They didn't have any 5W-30 conventional oil when last changed.

Have a nice day.

Couldn't resist. Ha, ha.
 

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I'm not sure I would use german made cooling systems as an good example. They are quite notorious for leaks and failures and on some models it is actually a good practice to do a total cooling system overhaul around 100k miles.
 

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Just for the fun of it:

Spring Clamps (Constant-Tension Clamps)

Automobile manufacturers use spring clamps on cooling system hoses because haven't found a better or cheaper way to apply tension to the hose regardless of the hose's condition. This matters because as the hoses age, they may harden, soften, swell, or lose their structural rigidity, and spring clamps will continue to apply force on the hose regardless of the condition of the hose.



Worm Clamps: An Inferior Alternative
When I am working on a leaking cooling system, often I am annoyed to find that some mechanic has replaced the original factory spring clamp (let's say an upper or lower radiator hose clamp) with a worm clamp. The mechanic probably went for the worm clamp because he didn't have the right tools to get the clamp off and didn't want to go through the hassle of putting the original clamp back on. Worm clamps are substandard compared to spring clamps because they fray the hose with the adjustment slots, they can strip, they can cut into the hose, they may not be able to apply adequate tension to prevent leaks, and they don't compensate the shrinkage of the rubber. So worm clamps are likely to lead to leaks in the future.

Source:
 

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I'm not sure I would use german made cooling systems as an good example. They are quite notorious for leaks and failures and on some models it is actually a good practice to do a total cooling system overhaul around 100k miles.
Ha, ha, What could be much worse that a plastic "Y" failure in a heating system on a frequent basis. Dorman, not Chrysler, to the rescue. Should be a mass recall IMO and the plastic "Ys" garbaged. Pathetic.(n)

Even the 4th Generation had some bad plumbing:
  • the steel return pipe from the radiator to the water pump rusted and leaked fairly frequently
  • the steel return heater pipe along the back of the engine rusted and leaked fairly frequently
  • the steel octopus pipe at the firewall, that connected to the rear heat, rusted and leaked fairly frequently until they changed over to aluminum piping.
  • spring type hose clamps that could lose their strength and allow coolant to drain out. Had one failure on the 2002 GC at the thermostat, thought the nipple had a hole in it. Caught it before any overheating. Had one fail at the connection lower radiator hose to the steel return pipe to the water pump on the 2007 GC. Had a severe overheating situation in that case.Yes, the chimes.
A couple years back when replacing all hoses on the Jeep, two of those clamps fell apart once touched They are junk just like the plastic "Ys".

Nope, Chrysler hasn't been stellar in designing long lasting plumbing.
 

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You can thank the mighty engineers from Daimler for showing Chrysler how to cheaply make a cooling system. Unfortunately they are applying these lessons to this day.

We all have our own experiences to draw conclusions from. I only had one constant tension clamp fail on me and it was also due to rust. It was an old beater and I replaced it with a worm type clamp. Worked with no problems.
But I've also seen hoses that were split due to an over tightened worm clamp or ones that leaked when cold, but stopped when hot.

In any case, I just ordered these from walmart. We'll see how they work out.
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Steel-Band-Clamp-23mm-for-Fuel-Line-Silicone-Hose-Tube-Spring-Clips-Clamp-Black-Manganese-Steel-10Pcs/115368414
 

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You can thank the mighty engineers from Daimler for showing Chrysler how to cheaply make a cooling system. Unfortunately they are applying these lessons to this day.

We all have our own experiences to draw conclusions from. I only had one constant tension clamp fail on me and it was also due to rust. It was an old beater and I replaced it with a worm type clamp. Worked with no problems.
But I've also seen hoses that were split due to an over tightened worm clamp or ones that leaked when cold, but stopped when hot.

In any case, I just ordered these from walmart. We'll see how they work out.
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Steel-Band-Clamp-23mm-for-Fuel-Line-Silicone-Hose-Tube-Spring-Clips-Clamp-Black-Manganese-Steel-10Pcs/115368414
That's a step up, for sure, from what Chrysler uses. You can always double clamp using a SS worm type clamp. :)

Gates has an interesting product on the market. Of course, it's the best. No worry about rust though.
Gates PowerGrip SB Heat Shrinkable Hose Clamp
 

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That's a step up, for sure, from what Chrysler uses. You can always double clamp using a SS worm type clamp. :)

Gates has an interesting product on the market. Of course, it's the best. No worry about rust though.
Gates PowerGrip SB Heat Shrinkable Hose Clamp

Lots of fun trying to apply heat evenly in the cramped engine bays though.
 

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That's a step up, for sure, from what Chrysler uses. You can always double clamp using a SS worm type clamp. :)

Gates has an interesting product on the market. Of course, it's the best. No worry about rust though.
Gates PowerGrip SB Heat Shrinkable Hose Clamp
Neat idea and I'm sure it works in some applications.

Lots of fun trying to apply heat evenly in the cramped engine bays though.
Yup, that's what I was thinking.
Also, what about taking it off? Do you have to cut it off and risk damaging the hose, or can they be taken off without the risk of damaging the hose?
 

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Neat idea and I'm sure it works in some applications.
Yup, that's what I was thinking.
Also, what about taking it off? Do you have to cut it off and risk damaging the hose, or can they be taken off without the risk of damaging the hose?
The video shows a slicer tool for that.

Gates note for heater hoses on RockAuto:
NOTE: Gates recommends replacing standard worm drive and spring loaded clamps with PowerGrip® SB clamps each time a new coolant hose is installed.
 
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