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Yes, you are correct, but not absolutely necessary, just to make your life easier.

On a two piston caliper, it is absolutely necessary.

But don't use plywood, use the old brake pad, it is already there anyways.
Sometimes just pry it back with a screwdriver between rotor and pad, if it slides real easy.

Nothing wrong with a nice painted up, made to order, piece of plywood, or wood lath, though. Some like to work with wood. :)
 

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I have a 2003 chrysler van i got my front brake pads changed the next day my brake pedal slipped to floor made it home by pumping brakes . had man come back an looked at it claimed a button on the steering column stopped my brakes from working and told me to not start it or anyhing it would blow my van up now im not a mechanic but im not a real dummy either. Now its been 8 days since he put brake shoe on an pedal goes down. Man wont call me even went by his house he woudent come to door any one know what may be the issue
I had the same issue with my 05, The problem was an irregularly worn Caliper bracket. It allowed the pads to become stuck at a slight angle and they would work for a while. But then they would move and the pedal would fall.Replaced the bracket and had no more problems.
 

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If the brakes were fine before the pad replacement, I see no reason to assume they were about to go bad anyway. AND the mechanic should have tested them after his work. Did he have to drive the car, at least out of his shop, after doing the work?

If there's a leak in the system, the pedal will go to the floor eventually, even after pumping it up, if you hold continuous pressure on it. Take it to a reputable shop. (See "Consumer's Checkbook" for ratings)
If it is just air in the lines, you can pump the brakes up and then the pedal will hold no matter how long you push on it. Have them bled; it's cheap.
If the master cylinder is bad, there is not necessarily leakage; it can be a damaged piston seal, so the fluid leaks past the piston, but not past the shaft seal.
In this case, the pedal will probably also slowly go to the floor, although it MIGHT hold in place after passing the damaged portion of the cylinder, though I would be surprised.
 

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OP's issue sounds like air in the system. Whoever told them it was a button on the steering wheel is an absolute idiot and should not be trusted to work on any part of anyone's car.

Yes, you are correct, but not absolutely necessary, just to make your life easier.

On a two piston caliper, it is absolutely necessary.

But don't use plywood, use the old brake pad, it is already there anyways.
Nah, I've used just a clamp on 2 piston calipers before. Sometimes you can't clamp them evenly with a pad because of the external geometry of the caliper. Just don't crank it down fast and switch pistons if the other starts moving out. Using the pad is the best practice, but if you can't do it without the clamp slipping or pinching the line, going slowly and carefully one at a time will work fine... might just take a bit longer.
 

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Nah, I've used just a clamp on 2 piston calipers before. Sometimes you can't clamp them evenly with a pad because of the external geometry of the caliper.
The pad you just removed is made to fit into that caliper, so I don't know what geometry you are talking about.

You can use a brake pad on any DC or DGC ever made.

Trying not to use one when you already have one in front of you is not very wise.

Please explain a little when using a brake pad on any of our vans is not possible.
 

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The pad you just removed is made to fit into that caliper, so I don't know what geometry you are talking about.
.....
Please explain a little when using a brake pad on any of our vans is not possible.
I was speaking in general terms, not specifically about these vans.

And the geometry I'm talking about is the outer back side of the caliper (hence "external geometry")... how else would a line be in the way? Reading posts fully before replying would save you a bit of time.
 

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I was speaking in general terms, not specifically about these vans.

And the geometry I'm talking about is the outer back side of the caliper (hence "external geometry")... how else would a line be in the way? Reading posts fully before replying would save you a bit of time.
Perfectly understood what you meant, people here are talking about Dodge/Chrysler minivans, and none have that kind of geometry you are talking about. You can safely use a brake pad to push the caliper pistons in on any Dodge/Chrysler minivan, I read correctly.

Why speak in general terms if this particular person was not talking in general terms, he was referring to a particular vehicle, we are talking about that particular vehicle too, only you, for some very strange and unknown reasons were talking about a very strange and unknown vehicle (Reading posts fully before replying would save you a bit of time.) , then advising to only push one piston at the time, which it is possible but risk pushing the other piston out and making a 1 minute job into a 30+ min. job.

Have a great day! :)
 

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Think you need to read the post you were originally arguing with again. (Would have saved you even more time. :p ) Now did I suggest he do 1 at a time? No. I said he could if there was an issue with doing it with the pads. And I also suggested if he did that to go slowly and switch if it seemed like the other piston was moving out.

I speak in general terms because, as much as I've done to these vans, I've surprisingly never done brakes on one with the HD setup. Which I know must be shocking to you since you spent a good bit of time a while back trying to convince me that I must have HD brakes since I have a 2013 that according to you should not have came with SD brakes.

Now if you're done being a troll, can we return this to civil discussion?
 

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It wouldn't surprise me if 'shade tree' just C-clamped the calipers without cracking the bleeders.

A hundred years ago, working at Sears auto center as a service adviser, I hung around the mechanics to learn about the new technology and systems. ABS had just started to appear. I forget the year but there was specific ways to do things that were different from 'the way we used to do stuff'

Anyone know if back feeding this ABS master cylinder could have hurt it?
No. I've done it a hundred times. We don't even know if it has ABS.
 

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I have a 2003 chrysler van i got my front brake pads changed the next day my brake pedal slipped to floor made it home by pumping brakes . had man come back an looked at it claimed a button on the steering column stopped my brakes from working and told me to not start it or anyhing it would blow my van up now im not a mechanic but im not a real dummy either. Now its been 8 days since he put brake shoe on an pedal goes down. Man wont call me even went by his house he woudent come to door any one know what may be the issue
There's a lot of useless arguing here but very few people actually talking about what might be wrong.
When the pedal drops to the floor It's due to an inability to hold pressure. The most obvious cause is a leak, but any leak this bad should be obvious. You should see brake fluid running out on the ground, probably by one of the wheels. This could have been caused by your mechanic manhandling the brake lines and breaking one. If he didn't support the calipers while he was working on them a brake line could easily have been damaged. Or, it could simply be an old rusty or cracked line that decided to break. I don't know that I'd be so quick to blame the mechanic, but I have no idea why he wouldn't look at the vehicle and tell you what's wrong with it. The vehicle is 18 years old, corrosion could have eaten through the brake lines anywhere, I've seen it happen many times. The other possibility is that there was a seal failure in the master cylinder. This could be just a coincidence, it would have nothing to do with the work he did. You need to get this looked at by a competent mechanic who stands by his work.
 

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There's a lot of useless arguing here but very few people actually talking about what might be wrong.
When the pedal drops to the floor It's due to an inability to hold pressure. The most obvious cause is a leak, but any leak this bad should be obvious. You should see brake fluid running out on the ground, probably by one of the wheels. This could have been caused by your mechanic manhandling the brake lines and breaking one. If he didn't support the calipers while he was working on them a brake line could easily have been damaged. Or, it could simply be an old rusty or cracked line that decided to break. I don't know that I'd be so quick to blame the mechanic, but I have no idea why he wouldn't look at the vehicle and tell you what's wrong with it. The vehicle is 18 years old, corrosion could have eaten through the brake lines anywhere, I've seen it happen many times. The other possibility is that there was a seal failure in the master cylinder. This could be just a coincidence, it would have nothing to do with the work he did. You need to get this looked at by a competent mechanic who stands by his work.
Hey Guy,
How about an internal leak?
 

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When the pedal drops to the floor It's due to an inability to hold pressure.
The most obvious cause is a leak, but any leak this bad should be obvious...... If he didn't support the calipers while he was working on them...The other possibility is that there was a seal failure in the master cylinder. This could be just a coincidence, it would have nothing to do with the work he did. You need to get this looked at by a competent mechanic who stands by his work.
This was pointed out in post #1

Scratch this, he/she would be able to see this leak and this was suggested since first reply.

I'll disegree with you. A master cylinder leak at this point and time more likely was caused by the mechanic by overpumping when flushing the brake system, I believe it was pointed out in post #9.

There's a lot of useless arguing here but very few people actually talking about what might be wrong

Wrong again, everybody here is actually talking about what might be wrong, you are just repetitive of what it was already said, you brought nothing new.

Lastly, O.P. posted and left. His/her problem probably is already fixed, and you still here arguing.

Stop arguing! 🤣
 

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What's really fun is that the OP never did return and is likely heading to Florida or Texas from their summer home in New York or Connecticut. No brakes and all....
 

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She may have had a nasty temper and the quasi mechanic was afraid of her, perhaps even posting a sign.
Coronasvirus
Stay Away
:)


Anyway, there was detail missing from the Post so pretty hard to help with no subsequent information to work with. Front brake pads or brake shoes?
 

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This was pointed out in post #1

Scratch this, he/she would be able to see this leak and this was suggested since first reply.

I'll disegree with you. A master cylinder leak at this point and time more likely was caused by the mechanic by overpumping when flushing the brake system, I believe it was pointed out in post #9.




Wrong again, everybody here is actually talking about what might be wrong, you are just repetitive of what it was already said, you brought nothing new.

Lastly, O.P. posted and left. His/her problem probably is already fixed, and you still here arguing.

Stop arguing! 🤣
You're overthinking things. "Overpumping"? What the **** is that? If the master cylinder failed from being pumped, it was going to fail anyway. Nothing was said about "flushing" they system. Changing brake pads does not involve opening the system or "pumping" anything. The most likely scenario is the guy broke or weakened one of the hoses, or the car is just old and rusted out, and nobody mentioned that as far as I noticed, so you can save your toxicity.
 

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You're overthinking things. "Overpumping"? What the **** is that? If the master cylinder failed from being pumped, it was going to fail anyway. Nothing was said about "flushing" they system. Changing brake pads does not involve opening the system or "pumping" anything. The most likely scenario is the guy broke or weakened one of the hoses, or the car is just old and rusted out, and nobody mentioned that as far as I noticed, so you can save your toxicity.
Someone should explain to you how a master cylinder can be easily damaged by the mechanic during brake service.

Keep watching this thread so you can learn someting.

Clue:


Some people put a piece of 2x4 or something under the brake pedal to avoid damaging the mastet cylinder during brake service.

Have a great day.
 

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Someone should explain to you how a master cylinder can be easily damaged by the mechanic during brake service.

Keep watching this thread so you can learn someting.

Clue:


Some people put a piece of 2x4 or something under the brake pedal to avoid damaging the mastet cylinder during brake service.

Have a great day.
I have no idea what you're blabbing about. There's no need to touch the brake pedal while changing brake pads, I've changed them a thousand times in the last 40 years. Never had a master cylinder fail from "pumping".
 
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