Solved Creaking Noise From Right Wheel While Turning



ChryslerMiniVan.net is the premier Chrysler Minivan Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Solved Creaking Noise From Right Wheel While Turning

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Toronto, ON
    Posts
    232
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts


    Solved Creaking Noise From Right Wheel While Turning

    From some weeks now, I was noticing a creaking noise (like an old mattress makes) when turning wheels getting out of my driveway or when the Van was stationary. Took it to the mechanic today and he sprayed some grease/lubricant stuff on the strut boots and this fixed the noise. I was really worried that this might be some serious issue with either the struts (strut bearings) or dry ball joint. However, a simple greasing of the plastic boots that cover the struts solved the issue.

    So, I thought I let everyone here know, if someone else is having similar issue to try this simple fix first.
    2006 Caravan SE. Oil Changed @165000KM.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    Chrysler Minivan Forums
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    13,410
    Country: Users Country Flag
    Thanks
    659
    Thanked 1,137 Times in 932 Posts


    Sounds like issue covered by Technical Service Bulletin #02-004-05 for 2001 - 2005 Vans and 2004 - 2005 Pacifica.
    SUBJECT: Creaking/Squawking Sound From Front Strut Area
    OVERVIEW: Involves applying lubricant to the jounce bumper of both front struts.
    2007 GC SXT - Magnesium - S&G - 3.8L - 112,920 kms
    2002 GC Sport - Stone White - 3.3L - 311,200 kms
    2003 Jeep TJ Sport - 4.0L - 251,430 kms

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    33
    Country: Users Country Flag
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts


    Is there a certain type of lubricant that is recommended? I have to assume anything with a residue would be out, due to issues with attracting and retaining dirt.
    ---
    2005 Chrysler T&C Touring Signature edition, 3.8L, Stow'n'Go
    2005 Volvo V70R
    2004 Volkswagen Passat wagon, 5spd
    1996 Dodge Ram1500, CC, 5.2L, 4WD

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    13,410
    Country: Users Country Flag
    Thanks
    659
    Thanked 1,137 Times in 932 Posts


    Quote Originally Posted by khnitz View Post
    Is there a certain type of lubricant that is recommended? I have to assume anything with a residue would be out, due to issues with attracting and retaining dirt.
    Here's what MOOG has to say. http://www.moogproblemsolver.com/_pd...K07_103_En.pdf
    I don't think the strut has to be removed to fix this. I can actually move the dust boot up and down on mine to get at the jounce bumper area (vehicle jacked up and wheel removed).

    A synthetic disc brake lubricant should be a good choice. It's considered a "dry" lubricant. For a little info on lubricants:
    http://www.brakeandfrontend.com/Arti...ubricants.aspx
    Moly and graphite have excellent staying power and won’t evaporate or burn off over time, and they won’t attract or hold dirt like ordinary “wet” greases can. This type of product is ideal for high temperature applications where long-lasting metal-to-metal lubrication is essential for good brake performance.

    Silicone-based brake grease is designed for caliper and wheel cylinder assembly work because silicone is an excellent lubricant for rubber and plastic. It is compatible with all rubber compounds including nitrile, teflon, nylon and other synthetic rubbers. Silcone’s normal working range is -40 degrees F to 400 degrees F. But it does not have the high temperature staying power of a high solids synthetic lubricant, and it is a “wet” lubricant that can attract and hold dirt, making it less suited for lubricating external metal-to-metal contact points, such as caliper mounts and shoe pads. This type of product is best suited for assembling calipers, wheel cylinders and master cylinders.

    Another synthetic-based brake lubricant uses polyalphaolefin (PAO) as its main ingredient. PAO-based brake lubricants are also excellent for assembly work and lubricating seals and boots. PAO offers superior rust protection, making it well-suited for brake systems operated in wet environments.
    2007 GC SXT - Magnesium - S&G - 3.8L - 112,920 kms
    2002 GC Sport - Stone White - 3.3L - 311,200 kms
    2003 Jeep TJ Sport - 4.0L - 251,430 kms

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    33
    Country: Users Country Flag
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts


    Thanks! I'll buy some of the synthetic brake lube and will plan to make this part of the work I do when I work on the brakes this weekend. I have new rotors and pads for all 4 corners ready to be installed. Hopefully none of the carrier guide pins are frozen (like I found on the fronts of our Volvo just a couple of weeks back).

    Karl
    ---
    2005 Chrysler T&C Touring Signature edition, 3.8L, Stow'n'Go
    2005 Volvo V70R
    2004 Volkswagen Passat wagon, 5spd
    1996 Dodge Ram1500, CC, 5.2L, 4WD

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    13,410
    Country: Users Country Flag
    Thanks
    659
    Thanked 1,137 Times in 932 Posts


    Quote Originally Posted by khnitz View Post
    Thanks! I'll buy some of the synthetic brake lube and will plan to make this part of the work I do when I work on the brakes this weekend. I have new rotors and pads for all 4 corners ready to be installed. Hopefully none of the carrier guide pins are frozen (like I found on the fronts of our Volvo just a couple of weeks back).

    Karl
    Your guide pins should be fine. If you replace a caliper, check the guide pins that come with the calipers, they may not be stainless steel like the OEs are. I just polish up the OEs and reuse them.
    Some tips:
    - you may have to remove the caliper bracket to get the rotor off if you have 4 wheel disc brakes (Teves system)
    - remove some brake fluid from the reservoir with a turkey baster before pushing the pistons back in or bleed the fluid off at the caliper/ cylinder via bleeder screw
    - if a piston does not compress easily, it could be sticking and cause problems later
    - file the crud off the slide areas for the pad backing plates
    - support caliper using bungee cord or wire so it won't drop or put strain on the hose
    - use the synthetic brake lubricant on the back of the pads as well (cylinder contact area) for anti-rattle. I use this stuff. Take a look the TDS for applications, etc.:
    http://www.permatex.com/products/Aut...per_Lube_1.htm
    2007 GC SXT - Magnesium - S&G - 3.8L - 112,920 kms
    2002 GC Sport - Stone White - 3.3L - 311,200 kms
    2003 Jeep TJ Sport - 4.0L - 251,430 kms

+ Reply to Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts