be careful with metal brake line



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Thread: be careful with metal brake line

  1. #1
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    be careful with metal brake line

    I just changed my rear brake line this weekend.First I saw something wet around the fuel tank,I thought it was water or fuel leaking,I could not smell anything,few days later when I was driving and applied the brake pedal hardly and heard a big noise from the rear,the brake became spongy.I tried to make it home and found out the rear brake line was rusty and broke,the brake fluid sprayed all over the place.
    I went to my local junkyard and got 2 metal line for $7.00.So be careful to check all of them before something could happen dangerously.
    98 Plymouth Grand Voyager 182,000miles

    98 Mitsubishi Galant ES 132,000miles

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  3. #2
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    I tis common on these vans. I had to change some lines to get it safetied.
    sent from my Univac using Assembler.
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    I agree that the brake lines have been a problem on these vans, but I also think there wouldn't be nearly as many related "close-calls" if people simply looked under their vans just as often as they look under the hood. Even if they're unsure as to what they're looking at, it's pretty safe to say if something is wet and is leaking under there, it's not good.

    My own father does this: He's excellent at making sure to check the fluid levels in his cars at least once every month. He'll even check the air in all the tires too and the condition of the serpentine belt. However, I can't remember a time he's ever crawled underneath his vehicles to have a look-see. Although I've made the point several times that thing's don't only fail in easy to see spaces, it's hard to create a new habit.

    If you make taking a good look at everything under your vehicle a priority with checking your oil and such, chances are you can catch problems like these WAAAAY before there's even a chance of a problem.
    2000 Chrysler 300M [Daily Driver] 158,000 miles as of Nov. 2014
    1996 Chrysler Town & Country LX [Always and forever the favorite.]
    2000 Chrysler Town & Country Limited [Gone, but not forgotten.]

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    1996 Town & Country, Original owners, 3.8L 95,000 miles.

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    Should be a law against the brake tubing used on today's vehicles. They all rust eventually, especially where salt is used on the roads or where they get hit by flying gravel. A couple of interesting sites on brake tubing follow:
    1. PolyArmour brake tubing @ http://www.carparts.com/POLYARMOUR-B...2292_10618.car
    PolyArmour® Brake Lines last longer, are easier to use and are kink-proof. In fact, they're the only replacement tube that passes the Vermont State Vehicle Inspection Guidelines!
    2. Copper-Nickel Automotive Vehicle Brake Tubing @ http://www.copper.org/applications/a...ive/brake.html
    Brake system tubing is vulnerable to the pressures of air or fluid flowing through it, to corrosion from road mud and salt, and to damage of any protective coatings on its surfaces from stone pecking where it is exposed under the chassis.

    Copper-nickel brake tubing provides superior reliability and assures both manufacturers and vehicle owners improved durability for effective long-life functioning of the brake system.
    And then there's "Mighty Wrap". Anybody have any experience with this product? Says it can be used on brake lines, but I would question that. Sounds like quite a product though.
    Automotive Repairs:

    •Vacuum hoses
    •Mufflers
    •exhaust systems
    •hydraulic hoses
    •oil lines
    •power steering lines
    •strengthening of cracked or broken parts
    •brake lines
    •antennas
    •roll bars
    •brush guards
    •air brake lines
    •tractor trailer muffler stacks
    •broken or torn electrical wires
    •CB and short wave radio antennas
    •heater lines
    •air conditioner lines
    •roof racks
    •windshield wiper arms
    •fuel lines
    Last edited by Jeepman; 05-27-2010 at 08:23 AM.
    2007 GC SXT - Magnesium - S&G - 3.8L - 112,920 kms
    2002 GC Sport - Stone White - 3.3L - 311,200 kms
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    I'm sure most cars get rusty brake lines eventually.
    But it doesn't seem to hard to use a better material. Is brass OK for this? Just as an example.
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    Quote Originally Posted by madbrad View Post
    I'm sure most cars get rusty brake lines eventually.
    But it doesn't seem to hard to use a better material. Is brass OK for this? Just as an example.
    I have used copper tubing (as a replacement) on non power assisted brakes many years back. It was a common practice then and the material lasted forever. I never had any issues with it while I used it but it was eventually outlawed as not being strong enough to take the increased brake line pressures.

    Now they are making steel brake lines more like copper and copper brake lines more like steel. Stainless steel sounds like the solution but to get the bending and flaring capabilities might require a low grade of stainless that will eventually rust.
    2007 GC SXT - Magnesium - S&G - 3.8L - 112,920 kms
    2002 GC Sport - Stone White - 3.3L - 311,200 kms
    2003 Jeep TJ Sport - 4.0L - 251,430 kms

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    Mine busted while depressing the caliper while i was changing my front brakes the worse spot was where it went over the gas tank. When i lowered the gas tank i could see the years of salt build up that rusted everything it touched. Now a few times each winter i pull her onto some ramps while i wash her and try and spray out aroung the gas tank b/c if i dont the salt will worry me to death, im not looking forward to another gas shower.

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    Very common on 3rd gens. I have been putting mine off for too long and plan on changing the metal lines soon before they fail on me due to my hard driving.

    I had a chevy blazer pop the metal lines in my driveway a few weeks ago, guy was glad it hadn't happened while he was on the expressway 10 minutes prior.
    Candy the van. '98 Sport 3.8L 132,200 miles. Used trans at ~96k. Great piece of my life and a fine van.

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    Under coating helps alot also.
    Silver 2002 Chrysler T&C EX 3.8
    Just hit 100,000 miles and counting.

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