Transmission Filter/Fluid Change DIY (pics)



ChryslerMiniVan.net is the premier Chrysler Minivan Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 59

Thread: Transmission Filter/Fluid Change DIY (pics)

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Niagara Ontario
    Posts
    746
    Country: Users Country Flag
    Thanks
    23
    Thanked 72 Times in 53 Posts


    I've never done a quick learn and never had any problems from not doing it.
    Hank
    07 Dodge Caravan SXT 3.3L Gold 105,000 kms
    05 Dodge Caravan SE 3.3L Silver 165,000 kms

  2. Remove Advertisements
    Chrysler Minivan Forums
    Advertisements
     

  3. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    586
    Country: Users Country Flag
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts


    I called my local 5 star yesterday and they told me 10 dollars for the filter and dodge does NOT make a gasket for the pan. He said that they use gasket maker junk and that is what dodge says to use. He said he would sell me that for 5 dollars. So is it ok to get the filter from auto zone and does autozone make a gasket for the pan.
    01 Dodge Grand Caravan (Sport) 3.3
    New tranny at 99,650 miles
    Currently 123,000 miles

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,985
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts


    Aftermarket kits will come with a gasket.Usually a cork/rubber composition.

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    New England, USA
    Posts
    1,659
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 12 Times in 9 Posts


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeepman View Post
    - "Quick learn" is optional, the transmission is smart and will learn itself within 70 restarts. Mine did and so have many others. Shops that change your fluid will do it for free though.
    I thought the quick learn had more to do with adjusting to slight mechanical differences due to manufacturing tolerances and solenoid actuation response times. I didn't think it had anything to do with the fluid, as long as it was changed within its design lifespan.
    2009 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT (3.8L), Light Sandstone Metallic, 125K miles
    2005 Volvo XC70, 160K miles

    Previous van: 2002 Chrysler T&C, eX (3.8L)

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 1 Post


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeepman View Post
    Nice job. You make it look easy. Great pictures.
    - Is there room enough toward the rear of the pan to put in a hole and oil drain plug? Perhaps I should get a pan from a junk yard and experment with putting in an insert. Here's a kit, looks easy enough:
    http://www.etoolcart.com/browseprodu...it-T-3020.HTML
    Great eye on finding this...I'm actually VERY tempted now. As far as room goes, I believe the pan is about twoish inches tall, so a 13mm bolt (same size as the oil pan drain, not sure what the one in your link is) would fit no problem.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeepman View Post
    - Torque is 165 inch lbs for the bolts. Bringing up the torque in increments and with a even distribution pattern, is important.
    - Torque wrench: You will probably need two, one for low torques (inch lbs. / low ft. lbs., transmission pan bolts for example) and one for high torques (ft. lbs., lug nuts for example).
    Very good advice, thank you, and will do!


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeepman View Post
    - Haynes say to loosen all bolts, remove the rear bolts, and tap the corner of the pan with a mallet. Will that work, to loosen the pan and drop it a bit, in your opinion.
    - Was the hammer used for the purpose of persuasion on the scrapers, or something else?
    Eh, the mallet might work, but my pan was REALLY good and sealed. The mallet would be a good addition, but I doubt it would completely knock it loose unless you got some major power behind it. My hammer was to tap the screwdriver into the seal and pry the pan loose...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeepman View Post
    - Maybe plastic scrapers instead of metal, would they work?
    A good quality sharp one would undoubtedly work. I would prefer to have a 3.5" razor blade scraper myself, but you gotta make do. Plastic would eliminate the possibility of gouging stuff that shouldn't be.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeepman View Post
    - "Quick learn" is optional, the transmission is smart and will learn itself within 70 restarts. Mine did and so have many others. Shops that change your fluid will do it for free though.
    Ok, I'll admit my naivete...why is any "learning" necessary? It's good that the tranny will do it on its own, but 70 restarts in my wife's van like two months!


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeepman View Post
    Thanks again for sharing your experience, and in pictures as well. Hope all goes well.
    And thanks for your kind words! I stand to LEARN a lot more from the members of this forum than teach...but thanks anyway!
    Mopar vans:

    -1994 Grand Caravan aka 1995 Grand Worktruck
    -1995 Grand Voyager 5-cylinder (not intentionally; one piston fell apart and so was shut off...ran for about 10k until the *working* motor was replaced)
    -1999 Grand Voyager 3.8L 275K miles and counting.
    -2003 T&C LXi Metallic Butane Blue, 3.8L 125k.

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 1 Post


    Quote Originally Posted by Kscha41 View Post
    I called my local 5 star yesterday and they told me 10 dollars for the filter and dodge does NOT make a gasket for the pan. He said that they use gasket maker junk and that is what dodge says to use. He said he would sell me that for 5 dollars. So is it ok to get the filter from auto zone and does autozone make a gasket for the pan.
    Ditto to 2002CaravanSE.

    From what I learned about gasket dressing, I would NOT use it to create/dress this transmission pan gasket. There's a slight possibility of the dressing getting into the fluid and while your filter would catch it, I wouldn't want any more foreign stuff in there that doesn't have to be.

    That said, I do believe the factory seal was gasket dressing and not a rubber gasket...hm don't know then.

    At any rate, the Autozone set for $10 comes with a rubber gasket, filter, and filter o-ring.

    Just so you know, this is a simple job, I'd go for it if I were you!
    Mopar vans:

    -1994 Grand Caravan aka 1995 Grand Worktruck
    -1995 Grand Voyager 5-cylinder (not intentionally; one piston fell apart and so was shut off...ran for about 10k until the *working* motor was replaced)
    -1999 Grand Voyager 3.8L 275K miles and counting.
    -2003 T&C LXi Metallic Butane Blue, 3.8L 125k.

  8. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Now, LA - Lower Alabama (SE corner)
    Posts
    2,435
    Thanks
    36
    Thanked 63 Times in 55 Posts


    Dear Tranny guys,
    I have had many of these same transmissions and I would like to pass on a couple of suggestions that may help some of you who are asking some great questions.
    1. Drain plug: You can go to AutoZone, etc. and in the Help! section you will find a transmission drain plug that requires only that you drill a 1/2" hole in the pan. I would put it in the back side, so it does not get hit, not on the bottom. It works with the principle of a Wellnut (these are also great little things to know about, at Lowe's in the screw section.) You insert the part into hole and tighten, the neoprene shell has a nut in it that tightens and seals all around. A center screw comes out and drains. Alternatively, you can buy a fluid hand pump and go down through the fill tube and pump it out pretty quick. (5 bucks on sale this month).
    2. Another way: Go to Napa and buy the NEOPRENE gasket for this transmission. You can drop it and retighten it 100 times. Also, buy two other things that will make this job a snap, a 10 mm long socket and a cat litter box, square. It is perfect for draining the fluid, it is square and catches everything. Once you get the original RTV gunk off the pan and transmission, don't put anything back on but the neoprene gasket, it needs no gasket cement or anything. The nice thing about this gasket is that is designed to hold the bolts also. Just start them all through the pan and it will hold them while you get them all started.
    3. Torque. I have done this job so many times I can't tell you and never used a torque wrench, but with the rubber gasket, you don't really need to since you don't do it real tight. If it needs tightening later (a slight leak) you can tighten it a little more. The way I always did it is to tighten the all just to the pan in the criss-cross pattern described. After this, (I have a stubby 3/8" for this) I hold the head of the socket wrench in my palm (not using the torque arm of the wrench) and tighten it about a 1/4 to half turn, till you start feeling some resistance in a criss cross pattern again. Then go around in reverse with a snugger just to make sure you did not miss one. As I mentioned, if it leaks a little somewhere, you can always tighten it a little bit. Just don't over torque, it is a finesse job. The pressure is about like you would use to open a door in the house with the head of the wrench in your palm. The key is the neoprene gasket. It is so good, you'll never go back. They are going to ask you how many holes the pan has (count the bolts, mine has one more hole than bolts (I think they hang it from this hole when they paint it).
    3. Removing the old gasket. The best thing to use is a slightly used semi flexible putty knife and some mineral spirits or naptha.
    4. If you strip a bolt, don't panic. Measure the depth of the hole with a nail. Compare with the length of the bolt. You can go to Lowe's and get a 1/4 or 1/2 inch longer bolt of the proper thread (take yours they have a device to tell you the thread pitch, it is metric) just make sure it is not longer than the hole depth. There is more thread up above the part that is stripped.
    5. On changing the oil. If you buy a case of transmission fluid, if you change the oil 3 times (a case) with a hundred miles or two between changes, you will replace all but one quart of the oil in the transmission. (1/2 of 8 is 4, 1/2 of 4 is 2, 1/2 of 2 is one, you get about half out each time. Cheaper and safer than a flush.
    6. To make the smallest mess: remove all but the corner 4 bolts. Loosen the 2 at the lowest point now and the oil will start to flow, when it stops, lower all four about a half inch and slosh the oil out the low point into the pan, move it up and down. When you remove the bolts, there is very little oil left in the pan. With a low cat litter box, you don't get a drop on the ground.
    7. On the Napa kit, the O ring was not the right one. Save your old one just in case. But this is a part I would just buy at Chrysler. You will get the right one and be sure before you leave it has the o ring in it.
    8 and final. The death of these transmissions for me has been burnt out fluid and clogged coolers. BAck flush the oil cooler in the radiator with clean fluid with air pressure till clean. Better yet, bypass it altogether with the copper tube after market one, 3/8" tubes visible thru the fins. It will not clog and let contaminants get to the pan and filter.
    Happy camping
    Terry

  9. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    13,334
    Country: Users Country Flag
    Thanks
    657
    Thanked 1,123 Times in 921 Posts


    Quote Originally Posted by jgiurleo View Post
    I thought the quick learn had more to do with adjusting to slight mechanical differences due to manufacturing tolerances and solenoid actuation response times. I didn't think it had anything to do with the fluid, as long as it was changed within its design lifespan.
    "Quick learn" is to put settings back to defaults, to stop the abrupt downshifting (3rd to 2nd I believe) after a fluid change. Sometimes the transmission needs to adjust to the new fluid. Mine adjusted on its own.

    Here's some info on the subject:
    http://www.notnormalmotorsports.com/...20Shifting.pdf
    2007 GC SXT - Magnesium - S&G - 3.8L - 112,920 kms
    2002 GC Sport - Stone White - 3.3L - 311,200 kms
    2003 Jeep TJ Sport - 4.0L - 251,430 kms

  10. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    New England, USA
    Posts
    1,659
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 12 Times in 9 Posts


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeepman View Post
    "Quick learn" is to put settings back to defaults, to stop the abrupt downshifting (3rd to 2nd I believe) after a fluid change. Sometimes the transmission needs to adjust to the new fluid. Mine adjusted on its own.

    Here's some info on the subject:
    http://www.notnormalmotorsports.com/...20Shifting.pdf
    Good link. Thanks.

    Well, so much for the idea that ATF+4 doesn't degrade for 100K miles. It apparently does, just not enough to damage anything, otherwise the TCM would not need to be reflashed/quick learned.

    Another thought is that perhaps the difference is accentuated if switching between different brands of ATF+4. I was reading somewhere that there are actually different blends that meet the ATF+4 specification, possibly resulting in different effects to the transmission.
    2009 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT (3.8L), Light Sandstone Metallic, 125K miles
    2005 Volvo XC70, 160K miles

    Previous van: 2002 Chrysler T&C, eX (3.8L)

  11. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Cincinnati
    Posts
    323
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 8 Times in 6 Posts


    When I did this last year my transmission did not act any different before/after the fluid change. I think the transmission learn is only in the case of your fluid change making a noticeable difference in the fluid itself (because the transmission must be able to tell something is different). So, if you do this regularly there should be no transmission learn.
    2005 T&C Signature Series, 64,xxx miles
    Lots of rust, leaking steering rack, bad rear AC condenser coil, rusted (and replaced) rear brake line. Looking forward to the next failure/defect that this Chrysler will bring into our lives.

+ Reply to Thread

Similar Threads

  1. Tranny Fluid & Filter Change
    By rob289c in forum 2nd Generation Chrysler Minivans: 1991-1995
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 05-17-2010, 09:36 PM
  2. Transmission and PS fluid change
    By PCE Scott in forum 4th. Generation Chrysler Minivans: 2001-2007
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 03-19-2010, 08:02 PM
  3. Strange banging/flapping noise 400 mi after transmission fluid/filter change
    By David in forum 3rd Generation Chrysler Minivans: 1996-2000
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-05-2009, 05:27 PM
  4. Transmission Fluid Change
    By 4_cars in forum 3rd Generation Chrysler Minivans: 1996-2000
    Replies: 72
    Last Post: 08-21-2009, 10:02 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts