How much does it Cost to get new Calipers Installed? [Archive] - The Chrysler Minivan Fan Club Forums

: How much does it Cost to get new Calipers Installed?



mgold
04-27-2010, 09:24 AM
How much would it Cost to get new Calipers Installed? I have a 97 Van with 114,000 miles on it.

cshoff
04-27-2010, 10:52 AM
Are you going to install them yourself, or take it to a shop and have them installed? It's about a 15 minute job per side to actually change them, the pads, and the rotors, but still, I'd expect a shop to charge an hour of labor to do the job. The calipers themselves cost $34.00 each at Autozone.

88Vic
04-27-2010, 11:22 AM
Do it yourself, even a guy like me who isn't too mechanically inclined I find it real easy, 2 bolts and the hose and it's off. When I put on new calipers, hoses, rotors and pads on my truck it took me a couple hors but only because I got hung up on the hoses but since you aren't replacing those it'll take like a half hour, hour at the most.

If you replace the rotors, get some grease and repack the bearings while you're at it.

cshoff
04-27-2010, 11:26 AM
Do it yourself, even a guy like me who isn't too mechanically inclined I find it real easy, 2 bolts and the hose and it's off. When I put on new calipers, hoses, rotors and pads on my truck it took me a couple hors but only because I got hung up on the hoses but since you aren't replacing those it'll take like a half hour, hour at the most.

If you replace the rotors, get some grease and repack the bearings while you're at it.

The bearings are contained in the hub assembly on the front of these vans. There is no way to repack them.

Jeepman
04-27-2010, 02:36 PM
Calipers are easy to change. For the change over, I usually will loosen up the banjo bolt on the old caliper while it is still in place, to make it easy to remove later, and then snug it up so it doesn't leak. Then after my new caliper is on I will remove the banjo bolt from the old (hanging from a wire connected to something) caliper, firstly noting the arrangement of how things go together, and then transfer the hose connection, bolt and two new copper washers, to the new caliper, making sure it has the right orientation. I then will snug up the banjo bolt finger tight and then finish snugging up with a wrench so it doesn't leak. I will do final tightening using a torque wrench, in stages, hoping I don't over-torque. I broke off a banjo bolt last year, still don't know why, unless it had been overtorqued / stretched some previously. Anyway, care is needed in tightening, perhaps the brake fluid provides lubrication and torque can be backed off by 5 or so ft.-lbs, from that stated. The two new copper washers should come with the new calipers. Never hurts to have a spare banjo bolt. I do now. :biggrin:

Here's a video (http://www.ehow.com/video_2331873_how-assemble-banjo-bolt-car.html) showing how the hose is installed to the caliper, with the two copper washers, plus how to bleed air out as well. You can actually see the piston move during the bleeding process. Neat. :thumb: The fluid coming out was super clean, no coffee colour to that.

A Mechanic will probably charge an hours labour to install new calipers. You can always negotiate. Did a little negotiating for a new windshield installation for my Jeep today. Previously had price of $250.00 from a place in the City. Asked him if he could do better than that and got it down to $200.00.
A more local Shop (less travel and easier to schedule) gave me a price of $225.00. I used the previous price of $200.00 to get them to lower their price to $200.00 today.

With a deductible of $250.00, there is a way to go through the insurance company and get the "out of pocket" down to about $150.00, but I am choosing not to go there.

tcwagner1
04-27-2010, 06:10 PM
Couple of notes, you might like to siphon out or otherwise suck out the fluid from the brake reservoir before you start and refill with fresh fluid before you start. You can try to plug the line while you are working so you don't just gush fluid, a clean unpainted golf tee might be just the size. If you are going to do all 4, do it in the order you will bleed it, if front two, I don't think it will really matter, but have plenty of fluid and don't let it run out during the process.

88Vic
04-28-2010, 01:59 AM
The bearings are contained in the hub assembly on the front of these vans. There is no way to repack them.
That sucks, just pop the cover off my truck and repack it. I love having a truck, everything is so easy to do.

shipo
04-28-2010, 06:54 AM
That sucks, just pop the cover off my truck and repack it. I love having a truck, everything is so easy to do.

From a different perspective, I find that it doesn't sucketh much. Why? Because the front end bearings are typically good to go for the life of the van. Said another way, if the bearings can go three or four hundred thousand miles, who cares if they're easy to repack or not? :)

andyg
04-28-2010, 09:30 AM
From a different perspective, I find that it doesn't sucketh much. Why? Because the front end bearings are typically good to go for the life of the van. Said another way, if the bearings can go three or four hundred thousand miles, who cares if they're easy to repack or not? :)

Haha they don't last for crap on my van. :biggrin:

Although last time around, the passenger side kept coming loose and I took it apart and cleaned out the junk grease and packed with good bearing grease. It has gone much longer without trouble for now. So I guess I did find a way to repack them.

mgold
04-28-2010, 06:44 PM
I might just do it myself. I need to buy a better Floor Jack, which would cost as much as 1 hour of Shop labor. The one I currently have isn't suitable for these Vans.

I'm not sure if the Caliper is necessarily bad. It might be something else. I'll probably see if I can grease up the Pins or something. Of course a Mechanic would know a lot quicker than I would!

Jeepman
04-28-2010, 07:05 PM
I might just do it myself. I need to buy a better Floor Jack, which would cost as much as 1 hour of Shop labor. The one I currently have isn't suitable for these Vans.

I'm not sure if the Caliper is necessarily bad. It might be something else. I'll probably see if I can grease up the Pins or something. Of course a Mechanic would know a lot quicker than I would!

The fact that you had difficulty collapsing the piston, with the bleeder screw open, says caliper piston/seal problem to me. It should have collapsed easily, without much force, maybe even by hand.

mgold
04-29-2010, 09:50 AM
Should I replace both Right and Left Calipers? It seems like a good idea to do both sides, Right?

paart
04-29-2010, 11:02 AM
It is always recommended that both sides be replaced at the same time, although IMHO, it depends on the reason for replacement to start with. Leaking seals, stuck piston, or accidental physical damage are three entirely different scenarios.

You had mentioned that you needed to buy a floor jack to do the job. More important than a floor jack is a pair of jack-stands to support the vehicle while being worked on. The vehicle's own "tire changing" jack will raise the vehicle high enough to remove a wheel and replace a caliper.

cshoff
04-29-2010, 01:03 PM
I agree with paart in that whether you replace both sides at the same time is dependent upon the reasons one side failed in the first place. I think it is more important to replace pads and rotors all at once so that they will be in a similar state of wear than it would be to arbitrarily replace both calipers simply because one had a failure of some sort. The last time I replaced a caliper (on a 1995 Oldsmobile Achieva), I only replaced the one that had a seal failure. The one on the other side still worked and looked fine.

nomoneynohunny
04-29-2010, 01:49 PM
What are the symptoms? The only real issue with calipers on my vehicles is stuck pistons due to rust, when a piston is out b/c the pads get thinner over time, the rubber boot doesn't keep the piston from rusting, so it won't go back in when pushed (or twisted).

Tip: When setting the brake pads make sure the rotor is tight on the hub with a lug nut or two (hand tight), so the pads sit completely straight on the rotor. If a part of the pad is not touching the rotor you will have spongy brakes.

Jeepman
04-29-2010, 02:03 PM
Should I replace both Right and Left Calipers? It seems like a good idea to do both sides, Right?

Based on my past experience last July with the rear disc brakes on my Caravan @ 201,700 kms (125,000 miles), I would say "YES". The story:
- replaced rear pads and rotors both sides. Rotors were original. Pads had lots of wear left but were showing crack lines.
- drove about 10 kms and stopped for gas. Noticed one rear brake was hot (could smell it and feel it).
- replaced the caliper, all was well.
- a couple weeks later, the other side heats up.
- replaced the caliper, and all has been well.
Those calipers had been replaced with aftermarket stuff @ 160,000 kms (99,200 miles) so they weren't long lasting.

Based on history, maybe NO if the remaining caliper has been in service for less miles.

Rule of thumb for calipers is something like 100,000 miles, although my fronts failed at 140,900 kms (87,000 miles) shortly after I had replaced the pads and rotors at 139,100 kms (86,200 miles).

- If you are going to replace the seals, I would likely do both sides and have happy motoring for another 100,000 miles.
- If you are going to replace the caliper, I would do both sides or keep a close eye on the old one.
- If a caliper fails prematurely, I wouldn't necessarily replace the other.

mgold
05-02-2010, 05:02 PM
The Left Caliper was seizing, and needed to be replaced. I took it to a mechanic, he did it for $200. He didn't seem to think the Right one needed to be replaced, as he thought it looked like it was working fine.

Thanks for the Help!

wa3ra
05-04-2010, 04:18 PM
I always replace them in pairs, and generally replace the soft lines with braided steel lines.

Most shops that charge book rate will charge an hour EACH, plus full retail or retail +10% on the parts, so they'll nail you for $400 for a job that you can do yourself for $80.